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Family Meetings ~ Where Kids and Parents Solve Bedtime Battles

Do your kids find ways to avoid bedtime? Like many parents, are you baffled by getting them to stay in bed? Look inside to find out how family meetings can help.

"There never was a child so lovely, but his mother was glad to get him asleep." - Ralph Waldo Emerson

I'm thirsty

I'm not tired.

I can't sleep.

I have to go to the bathroom

Parents around the world hear these complaints every night. Some parents yell. Some get hooked into answering every bellyache. Some figure out how to stop bedtime battles. Now you can use the family meeting to solve this problem.

The Family Meeting:

This is the time to ask your kids questions. Listen to their solutions. They might be tougher on themselves than you would be.

The Questions:

Why don't kids stay in bed at bedtime?

How could a routine help?

What should parents do when kids keep getting out of bed?

How late should kids stay up on weekends? Why?

What is a reasonable bedtime routine you'd like to follow?

What should happen if you don't follow your routine?

Research tells us that kids obey rules better if they help to develop them. Test this theory on your kids. Let me know the results.

Of course, you're the parent. You have the final say. Don't agree to anything you might regret later.

Please share your experiences below.

I invite you to receive 80 fun activities to play with your kids when you subscribe to my Free Parenting Newsletter at http://www.KidsDiscuss.com

 


How Family Meetings Help Kids Create Fun Story Nights

Kids love parents to read stories. They cuddle, feel cozy, and close to their parents too. So turn off the chores, the computer, and the TV.  Take time to have fun with your kids.

The family meeting is the perfect time to set up regular story time dates. Your kids will look forward to this special time with you and the family.

The Family Meeting:

Family meeting discussions are easy to have in the car, while eating a meal, before dinner, or right before bed.

Gather the family together and ask each member:

  1. What kind of stories do you like best?
  2. Can you name some of your favorites?
  3. When would you like to go to the library and pick some out?
  4. How can we choose books everybody likes?

Spice up Story Night:

Read with your best expression. Use gestures. Delight your family. Tell each member to act out different parts of the story.

Become a scary storyteller within the glow of the fireplace.

On a stormy night start a funny, scary, or family story. Then tell the person next to you to continue the story until it is done.

Hold a storytelling contest. Vote for the best storyteller. Post the winner's picture on the refrigerator for a week.

Have you tried a story night? What did you do? How did it go?

Receive 80 fun activities to play with your kids when you subscribe to our Free Parenting Newsletter at http://www.KidsDiscuss.com


How Family Meetings Help Kids Discuss Treasure Hunts

Turn your family meeting into planning a treasure hunt. Your kids' imaginations will run wild and their heart will pound with excitement.

Enjoy their eager suggestions and outbursts. Learn more about their creative thinking too.

The Family Meeting:

Brainstorm treasure hunting ideas. Write down every suggestion. Do not judge the ideas or their eagerness will drift downward until they quit.

Here are some treasure hunt questions to ask your kids:

For Indoors ~

Can you think of a way to use shapes, objects, and/or colors for treasure hunts?

How about an alphabet treasure hunt with rhymes?

Can you use pictures to create a treasure hunt? How?

Which kind of treasure hunt should we have?

For Outdoors ~

Where will the treasure hunt be?

Who will write the clues?

Should we look for clues separately or together?

What should the treasure be?

Treasure hunts can be used for holidays and special occasions. Don't do all the planning yourself. Get your kids involved. Increase the fun. Create cool memories for a lifetime.

Does your family create treasure hunts? What kind?

Receive 80 fun activities to play with your kids when you subscribe to my Free Parenting Newsletter at http://www.KidsDiscuss.com


How Family Meetings Help Kids Discuss Stealing

Your child knows stealing is a shady problem, done in the dark, quietly and carefully. But does she know it's wrong? If kids get away with taking money from mom's purse, or that new toy on a student's desk, what's the harm?

Stories like "Thelma the Thief" from Character Building on Backtalk Street p.40 show the dark side of stealing.  The fear of being caught, then being caught, and losing one's reputation were a high price for Thelma to pay. Such stories help kids think and discuss the problems with stealing.

I remember a child who stole something from almost everyone in her class. Her father was in prison and her mother worked two jobs. She took toys, candy, and school supplies from other students to fill that empty inner space where love and attention belonged. But no material thing solved her loneliness so she kept stealing until her mother realized the problem.

Some children steal from emotional need. Other kids steal for other reasons.

Your child needs to know that stealing is wrong and you can teach her in the family meeting.

The Family Meeting:

Discuss a story about stealing like "Thelma the Thief." Use questions that enlighten the problem with stealing like:

  1. What didn't Thelma understand about the other kids' feeling when she took their things?
  2. Has anyone ever stolen your things?
  3. How would you feel if you took something that didn't belong to you?
  4. Why is earning what you want better than stealing what you want?
  5. What advice would you give to kids who steal?

By asking good questions your child's inner light bulb will show her the dark side of stealing.

Feel the satisfaction of parenting well while she shares her thoughts. Why? Because you planted the moral seeds of understanding.

How do you teach your child to earn what she wants? Please comment.

Receive 80 fun activities to play with your kids when you subscribe to my Free Parenting Newsletter at http://www.KidsDiscuss.com

 

 


Family Meetings – How Kids Discuss Gossips

When kids gossip they don’t realize the trouble they cause themselves and others. The family meeting can help. Look inside and find out how.

In my book, Character Building on BackTalk Street, Gabby the Gossip phones Betty the Bragger, “Hi Betty, guess what I saw at Tilly’s house last night? I saw her dad’s teeth in a glass of water on the kitchen sink.” Page 51

Why not read a story about gossips to teach your family values? Here are some questions to use in your family meeting?

The Family Meeting

Let’s discuss Gabby the Gossip. These questions will help your children think through the problems with gossiping.

What did Gabby need to learn about gossiping?

Why do you think kids gossip?

How do you feel when someone gossips about you?

If you gossip, will kids stop sharing their secrets with you? Why?

What advice would you give to gossips?

Don’t be surprised if your kids love discussing this problem. They’ll get to share their thoughts, real examples, and feelings about gossiping. If they already gossip, they’ll think twice before they gossip again. You’ll be raising their family values and building their character too.

These family meeting blogs will become my next eBook.

Want to have your comments, questions, tips, and first name included in this next Family Meeting eBook? Just leave your comments below.

If spelling or grammar is problem, don't worry. I'll do the editing. To assure you of quality, no links or objectionable material will be included.


Family Meetings ~ How Kids Discuss Chores and Like Them Too

How can family meetings promote “Work before you play?” When your ‘Sammy the Slacker’ sneaks out of chores, watches you do them, or would rather play than work today, use the family meeting.

 “If work’s your thing,

Don’t count me in.

I’d rather play,

Than work today,

Gone fishing!”

From Sammy the Slacker in Character Building on BackTalk Street. page 81.

Why not announce, “We have a problem? Let’s get together before dinner and discuss it.” Have your kids guess what the problem is.

Family Meeting

Discuss how, “Work before Play” motivates kids to get their chores done. 

Listen to their ideas.

Ask, “How could kids tackle their chores and like them too. They might say, “That’s impossible.”  Take time to laugh.

Say, “No, I’m serious. Let’s brainstorm.”

Listen again. Tell the note taker to write the suggestions in your Family Meeting Diary.

Perhaps you’ll use the Chore Chart Kit. If so, consider one of the 80 Fun Activities as rewards for doing their work before they play. Pick up the 80 fun activities by subscribing to my free parenting newsletter at http://www.KidsDiscuss.com

Family meetings are excellent for deciding on age appropriate chores You’ll find them in my Chore Chart Kit with a special chart, and rewards. Why not train your kids to become responsible for their chores and like them too? Don’t do all the work. Share the chores.

 

Want to have your comments, questions, tips, and first name included in this next Family Meeting eBook? Just  leave your comments below.

If spelling or grammar are problem, don't worry. I'll do the editing. To assure you of quality, no links or objectionable material will be included.