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This Parenting Tip Creates Fun Bonding Time with Kids!

"Building Character Starts with Getting Your Kids To Talk."

Parenting Tips by Jean Tracy, MSS, for grades K-6:

This Parenting Tip comes from our list of 80 fun activities to share with your kids. While waiting in the airport with my grandkids and their friends we had a great time. We took turns joking and everyone giggled. Whether you're at home, in the car, or waiting for an appointment you can have fun joking with your kids too.

Parenting Tip for Enjoying Your Kids:

Almost every kid knows some knock-knock jokes. Lots of joke books include them. For instance,

You: "Knock-Knock."

Your child: "Who's there?"

You: "Can't a."

Your child: "Can't a who?"

You: "Can't elope today. Ask me tomorrow."

In this case, the knock-knock ended with the fruit cantaloupe. It is pretty silly but young kids love knock-knock jokes because they are easy to make up and fun to tell. Why not bond with your kids by taking turns telling knock-knock jokes. They'll love having fun with you.

How do you have fun with your child? Let me know by emailing me at http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/contact.asp . When I receive your tip, I'll send you a surprise.

Jean Tracy, MSS publishes a Free Parenting Newsletter. Subscribe at http://www.KidsDiscuss.com and you'll receive 80 bonding activities to share with your kids.

 


Parenting Skills for Handling Complaining Kids!

"Building Character Starts with Getting Your Kids To Talk."

Parenting Tips by Jean Tracy, MSS, for grades K-6:

Today's Parenting Skills Tip fits our Parenting Skills Kit. Have you ever felt insulted by your child's refusal to eat what you fix? Most parents hear, "I don't like this. Do I have to eat it? Why don't you ever fix what I like?" I sure did.

If you've just come from work and want to fix something quick and easy, you might not please anybody. What can you do?

Parenting Skills Tip – Use Logical Consequences:

You don't have to please everybody. You don't have to accept complaints either. Why not use a logical consequence? A logical consequence is a natural response to complainers. It makes sense too.

If your children don't like what you fix, take them shopping. Have them pick out easy meals to fix. Then teach them to prepare at least part of the dinner. For instance, your eight-year-old Allison might fix a green salad. Six-year-old Sammy can set the table. Ten-year-old Andy can set up the chicken with shake 'n' bake. When you come home, all you have to do is pick out a vegetable.

Parenting Skills Conclusion:

Logical Consequences worked with my complainers. It can work with yours too. You'll be teaching your children responsibility. They'll be fixing what they like. They won't be complaining either. Logical consequences build character too.

How do you handle your dinner complainers? Let me know by emailing me at http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/contact.asp . When I receive your tip, I will send you a surprise.

Treat yourself to our Parenting Skills Kit at http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/parent_resource_center.asp?pr_id=kd003 and discover how easy and fun it is to build your child's character by teaching responsibility.

Jean Tracy, MSS publishes a Free Parenting Newsletter. Subscribe at http://www.KidsDiscuss.com and receive 80 fun activities to share with your kids.

 

 

 


Parenting Skills: The Power of Affirmations

"Building Character Starts with Getting Your Kids To Talk."

Parenting Tips by Jean Tracy, MSS, for grades K-6:

Today's parenting skills tip is one of our 75 affirmations in our Parent Affirmations Kit. Affirmations are the loving words your child hears when you praise her. Those loving words have the power to raise her self-esteem, love being near you, and increase her positive behavior.

When a person gives you a sincere compliment how do you feel? Most people would say, "Great!" This is how your child feels when you take the time to notice her good behaviors and give her your honest praise.

How to Give Powerful Parenting Affirmations:

"I enjoy watching you grow because…" Complete this sentence with a solid reason. Your child will glow with your praise. You could give her a hundred different reasons like:

  • "I enjoy watching you grow because you treat your friends well."
  • "I enjoy watching you grow because love learning new things."
  • "I enjoy watch you grow because you have a great sense of humor."

Parenting Affirmations Conclusion:

Imagine your child receiving one of the above affirmations. Would she glow knowing you notice how she treats her friends? Would she deepen her love for learning because you appreciate her drive for knowledge? Would she love being near you because you enjoy her sense of humor?

Giving your child meaningful compliments by completing the sentence, "I enjoy watching you grow because…" is a fine way to build character too.

How do you compliment your child? Let me know by emailing me at http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/contact.asp . When I receive your tip, I'll send you a surprise.

Check out our Parent Affirmations Kit at http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/parent_resource_center.asp?pr_id=kd009 and watch your child grow.

Jean Tracy, MSS publishes a Free Parenting Newsletter. Subscribe and you'll receive 80 bonding activities to share with your kids. Sign up at http://www.KidsDiscuss.com

 

 


This Parenting Skill Teaches Self-Care to Kids

"Building Character Starts with Getting Your Kids To Talk."

Parenting Tips by Jean Tracy, MSS, for grades K-6:

Today's Parenting Skills Tip, an age-appropriate chore for kids from ages 5-6, is from our Chore Chart Kit. Today's chore can teach your child a sense of order and self care.

Have you ever seen a child whose hair is rarely combed? I remember teaching a child whose clothes were unmatched and dirty even though he had other clothes. Unfortunately, his classmates poked fun of him. At eight years of age he was old enough to comb his hair and pick out clean matching clothes.

Parenting Skills Tip for an Age-Appropriate Chore:

It may take some time in the beginning to teach your child self-care but it's worth it. By the age of five or six both boys and girls should be able to comb their hair and put on matching clothes. Many kids, when left to themselves, insist on wearing the clothes they choose. Sometimes their choices are strange.

Why not take some time during the day to lay out your child's clothes and teach him how to match styles and colors. It could be fun, especially if it isn't right before school when he is likely to fight you.

At another time teach your child to style his hair in front of the mirror. You could even take a before and after picture. Make it fun. Laugh. Ask your child's opinions too.

Age-Appropriate Chores Conclusion:

Once your child knows how to match his clothes and comb his hair, he'll feel a sense of pride, other kids won't poke fun at him, and he will be learning to take care of himself. All it takes is a little time. When your child looks combed and well matched be sure to praise him. You'll be building his character too.

How do you teach your child self-care? Let me know by emailing me at http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/contact.asp . When I receive your idea, I will send you a surprise.

Treat yourself to our Chore Chart Kit at http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/parent_resource_center.asp?pr_id=kd008 and discover how easy and fun it is to build your child's character with age-appropriate chores.

Jean Tracy, MSS publishes a Free Parenting Newsletter. Subscribe at http://www.KidsDiscuss.com and receive 80 fun activities to share with your kids.

 

 

 


This Parenting Skill Gives Respect to Kids

"Building Character Starts with Getting Your Kids To Talk."

Parenting Tips by Jean Tracy, MSS, for grades K-6:

Today's parenting tip comes from our Parenting Skills Kit. When parents treat their children with kindness and firmness they give respect. Today's parenting skill adds to that respect.

This Parenting Skill Builds Respect in Parents and Kids:

Listen respectfully to your child. When you listen with respect it doesn't mean you have to listen to every word, especially if you have a chatterbox on your hands. You might have to teach your talkative child to be a listener too.

We all have one mouth and two ears. Why? So we'll listen more than talk.

Listening with respect means that you look into your child's eyes, repeat some of your child's words, and ask questions to further your understanding. Listening in this way shows you really care. Think about it. Wouldn't you want people to treat you this way? Your child does too.

Parenting Skills Conclusion:

Listening with respect teaches your child to do the same with you and with others. Try it. I bet your respectful listening will bring you and your child even closer. Remember, building character starts with getting your kids to talk.

Do you have a respectful way of listening to your child? Let me know by emailing me at http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/contact.asp If I use your idea, I will send you a surprise.

Pick up our Parenting Skills Kit at http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/parent_resource_center.asp?pr_id=kd003 and feel good about your parenting.

Jean Tracy, MSS publishes a Free Parenting Newsletter. Subscribe at http://www.KidsDiscuss.com and receive 80 fun activities to share with your kids.

 

 

 

 

 


This Social Skill for Kids Creates Respect!

"Building Character Starts with Getting Your Kids To Talk."

Parenting Tips by Jean Tracy, MSS, for grades K-6:

Today's parenting tip comes from our Social Skills Kit for Kids. When your kids use social skills they receive rewards like friendships, fun, and fitting in.

The good news is that social skills are easy to teach. Parents who start teaching early give their kids a head start. Below is one of the first social skills all kids need to learn.

This Social Skill Creates Respect:

Teach your child to say, "Please" and "Thank You." Kids will like your child. Adults will appreciate his manners. He'll be using the "magic" words too.

Children who constantly demand that others give them what they want are often disliked. Parents who are ruled by the demands of disrespectful kids create unwelcome children.

Social Skill Conclusion:

Why not make up some typical situations and role play "Please" and "Thank You" with your child? Then have your child practice at home, with grandparents, and friends. Your child will get the respect he wants because he is giving it.

Teach your child the "magic" words. They'll open doors to a better life.

What social skills do you teach your kids? Let me know by emailing me at http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/contact.asp If I use your idea, I will send you a surprise.

Pick up our Social Skills Kit for Kids at http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/parent_resource_center.asp?pr_id=kd011 and open the doors to a better life for your child.

Jean Tracy, MSS publishes a Free Parenting Newsletter. Subscribe at http://www.KidsDiscuss.com and receive 80 fun activities to share with your kids.


This Parenting Tip Builds Character by Playing with Kids!

"Building Character Starts with Getting Your Kids To Talk."

Parenting Tips by Jean Tracy, MSS, for grades K-6:

Today's parenting tip comes from our list of 80 bonding rewards. Bonding rewards satisfy your kids more than a red truck, a new dress, or a candy bar. Bonding rewards are fun activities with you. They don't have to cost money. They just have to be fun.

When you give a person your time and attention, you are giving them what every human being craves. The same is true when you give your time and attention to your child.

Bonding Activity:

Depending the on the age of your child, why not play a game of hide 'n' seek? This game creates both excitement and laughter. It's fun and it doesn't cost a penny. By playing with your child you create a bond that ties your child to you in positive ways.

When you subscribe to our Free Parenting Newsletter, you'll receive our 80 bonding activities to share with your kids. All you have to do is sign up at http://www.KidsDiscuss.com

Remember building character starts with getting your kids to talk. Why not play with them too?

How do you bond with your kids? Let me know by emailing me at http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/contact.asp If I use your idea, I'll send you a surprise.

With warm wishes for your parenting success,

Jean Tracy, MSS

 

 


Parenting Skills: This Dilemma Discussion Teaches Kids How to Reason

"Building Character Starts with Getting Your Kids To Talk."

Parenting Tips by Jean Tracy, MSS, for grades K-6:

Today's parenting skills tip is one of the 51 dilemmas in our Dilemma Discussion Kit. Dilemmas are moral problems for your child to solve. They are easy to use, take little time, and fun to discuss.

A Common Discussion Dilemma for Kids:

Have your child pretend this is happening at your dinner table. Ask the questions and listen for your child's reasoning.

"Your mother just made a dinner you don't like. Think before you speak. What will you say to your mother? Why?"

Think about your child's answer. Was he polite? Was he silly? Was he mean? This information will give you a clue to how he thinks and where he could use your help. If you don't like your child's answer, probe with thoughtful questions like:

  • If you don't want to hurt her feelings, how could you tell your mother you don't like her dinner?
  • What tone of voice would you use?
  • What could you do to get your mother to make meals you do like?

Dilemma Discussions Conclusion:

"Building Character Starts with Getting Your Kids to Talk." Dilemma discussions are great ways to get your kids to reason clearly, speak respectfully, and solve problems too.

Do you have a way of discussing dilemmas with your children? Let me know by emailing me at http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/contact.asp If I use your idea, I will send you a surprise.

Pick up our Dilemma Discussion Kit at http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/parent_resource_center.asp?pr_id=kd010 and discover how easy and fun it is to build your child's character with discussion dilemmas.

Jean Tracy, MSS publishes a Free Parenting Newsletter. Subscribe at http://www.KidsDiscuss.com and receive 80 fun activities to share with your kids.