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Parenting Skills Blog ~ How Specific Praise Helps Kids

"Building Character Starts with Getting Your Kids To Talk."

Parenting Tips by Jean Tracy, MSS, for grades K-6:

This Parenting Skill Comes from my Parenting Skills Kit:

Praising kids offers them the 3 things all children crave, attention, appreciation, and affection. General praise is lukewarm praise. Lukewarm praise fails to satisfy the craving that kids want. Specific praise satisfies those cravings. Why not give specific praise?

Parenting Skill – How to Give Specific Praise:

Focus on a specific act to praise. Instead of saying, "Good game, Seth," say, "Seth, you hit that ball with such power, no wonder it flew out of the ballpark." Can you see the difference? The first praise was lukewarm and general. The second praise was specific and positive.

One more thing, use completely positive praise. Some parents stick on handles like, "You usually strike out." Knock off negative handles because they deflate your kids and leave them feeling angry.

If you liked the above parenting tip, pick up our Parenting Skills Kit at http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/parent_resource_center.asp?pr_id=kd003

Subscribe to my FREE Parenting Newsletter at http://www.KidsDiscuss.com and receive 80 fun activities to share with your kids.

How do you praise your kids? Let me know by emailing me at http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/contact.asp . When I receive your tip, I'll send you a surprise.

Here's to your parenting success,

Jean

Jean Tracy, MSS

 

 

 

 

 


Parenting Skills Blog ~ This Social Skill Helps Shy Kids

"Building Character Starts with Getting Your Kids To Talk."

Parenting Tips by Jean Tracy, MSS, for grades K-6:

This Parenting Tip Come from my Social Skills Kit for Kids:

Social Skills are valuable assets for every child. Kids who don't know how to relate to others will have a difficult life if they don't learn. Fortunately, you can teach your kids social skills at an early age. They're so easy to teach too.

Social Skill – Say "Hi" to People You Know:

Although some people find this difficult due to shyness, it is very easy if they practice. Role-play this skill by telling your child to:

  • Smile at the other person.
  • Look that person in the eye.
  • Speak with a cheerful confident voice when saying "Hi."

When your child does the role play well, tell her it's time to practice on other kids. Let her know that other kids will feel special because she said "Hi." Tell her she'll feel great because she'll find out that being friendly is fun and easy.

Ask her to let you know how her practice turned out. You'll enjoy hearing the results.

If you liked the above parenting tip, pick up our Social Skills Kit for Kids at http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/parent_resource_center.asp?pr_id=kd011

Subscribe to my FREE Parenting Newsletter at http://www.KidsDiscuss.com and receive 80 fun activities to share with your kids.

How do you teach your kids social skills? Let me know by emailing me at http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/contact.asp . When I receive your tip, I'll send you a surprise.

Here's to your parenting success,

Jean

Jean Tracy, MSS

 

 

 


Parenting Skills Blog ~ Reward Chores and Have Fun with Your Kids

"Building Character Starts with Getting Your Kids To Talk."

Parenting Tips by Jean Tracy, MSS, for grades K-6:

 

This Parenting Tip comes from my 80 Activities to Share with Your Kids:

Having fun with your children is a wonderful way to bond with them. Parents who lecture, nag, and scold rather than enjoy their kids won't have the influence to guide their kids when they need to. Why? Because their kids have turned them off. Who would want to confide, get advice, or spend time with a negative parent?

This doesn't mean a parent can't be firm with their kids. In fact, being firm is good. Firmness needs to be balanced with fun times too.

Many families enjoy playing video games (hopefully, nonviolent games). In our last post, we talked about using the formula "First this and then that…"

Let's say you want your child to finish washing the pots and pans after dinner, or take out the garbage, or sweep the kitchen floor. Using the formula is perfect for concluding the task with fun. Here's how you might use the formula.

  1. First wash the pots and pans and then we'll play a video game.
  2. First take out the garbage and then we'll play a video game.
  3. First sweep the kitchen floor and then we'll play a video game.

Parenting Skills Conclusion:

See how easy it is, no lecturing, nagging, or scolding. Your kids will be eager to complete their chores just to have a fun time with you. You be teaching your children self-discipline. You'll be connecting with them and you'll be building character too.

If you liked the above parenting tip, I invite you to subscribe to my FREE Parenting Newsletter at http://www.KidsDiscuss.com and receive 80 fun activities to share with your kids.

How do you bond with your kids? Let me know by emailing me at http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/contact.asp . When I receive your tip, I'll send you a surprise.

Here's to your parenting success,

Jean

Jean Tracy, MSS

 

 

 

 


Parenting Skills Blog ~ How Logical Consequences Teach Self-Discipline to Kids

"Building Character Starts with Getting Your Kids To Talk."

Parenting Tips by Jean Tracy, MSS, for grades K-6:

This Parenting Tip comes from our Logical Consequence List:

Child discipline is easier when you use logical consequences. When a child needs disciplining, it's important to make sure the punishment fits the crime. If it does, the punishment is logical. If it doesn't then the punishment doesn't make much sense.

If your kids run out to play after leaving their toys scattered throughout the house, the logical consequence is to call them back to pick up their toys. If they do it frequently, they could lose their toys for a week. In our house we had a Saturday Box. The toys went into the Saturday Box and could not be emptied until the kids did their chores on Saturday.

If you chose to have your kids pick a bucket of weeds for leaving their toys around, it wouldn't make much sense because the punishment didn't fit the crime. The punishment wasn't a logical consequence.

Consider using logical consequences the next time your child messes up or needs to learn the results of his behavior. You'll be teaching your child self-discipline, to think before he acts, and to be logical. You'll be building character too.

Subscribe to our Free Parenting Newsletter at http://www.KidsDiscuss.com and you'll receive 80 bonding activities to share with your kids.

How do you punish your kids when they need it? Let me know by emailing me at http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/contact.asp . When I receive your tip, I'll send you a surprise.

Here's to your parenting success,

Jean Tracy, MSS


Parenting Skills ~ Use This Formula to Get Kids to Do Their Chores!

"Building Character Starts with Getting Your Kids To Talk."

Parenting Tips by Jean Tracy, MSS, for grades K-6:

This Parenting Tip comes from our Chore Chart Kit.

If your child is 7-years-old or older here's a chore your child must complete - his homework. I know your kids would rather watch TV, play video games, or have fun with friends than complete schoolwork. Many fights occur when urging your kids to do their homework. "I'll do it after dinner. Can I play just one video game? Can I watch my favorite TV show first," they plead. When bedtime rolls around, the homework isn't done.

How can you get your kids to do their homework first?

Here's a formula that works – First this…then that:

  • First complete your homework, and then you can watch TV.
  • First finish your schoolwork, and then you can play a video game.
  • First do your math homework, and then you can play with your friends.

By insisting your child complete his homework first, you are helping your child make homework a priority, develop self-discipline, and earn better grades.

The "First this, then that…" Formula works with other chores, events, and daily routines too. There is only one rule, you must be consistent! Being consistent will prevent many fights because your child will know when you say, "First this…then that," you really mean it.

If you liked the above parenting tip, you'll love our Chore Chart Kit at http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/parent_resource_center.asp?pr_id=kd008

Subscribe to our Free Parenting Newsletter at http://www.KidsDiscuss.com and you'll receive 80 bonding activities to share with your kids.

How do you get your kids to do their chores? Let me know by emailing me at http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/contact.asp . When I receive your tip, I'll send you a surprise.

Here's to your parenting success,

Jean Tracy, MSS

 

 


Parenting Skills Blog ~ How to Deal with Tattletales

"Building Character Starts with Getting Your Kids To Talk."

Parenting Tips by Jean Tracy, MSS, for grades K-6:

This Parenting Tip comes from our Dilemma Discussion Kit:

If your child is a tattletale, this dilemma is for you. Kids who delight in tattling on other kids can be as irritating as mosquitoes. They enjoy hurting others with their biting words. They hope you'll punish their victims too. Below is a dilemma to discuss with your kids:

"Pretend you enjoy tattling on your classmates when they aren't doing their work. You aren't doing your work either. What's wrong with this picture?" Why?"

To increase the discussion, consider asking these questions:

  • How might the victim of your tattling feel?
  • What do you think about tattletales?
  • When is it important to tell on someone?
  • What advice would you like to give tattletales? Why?

Discussing dilemmas help your child grow in empathy. Dilemmas help them see the difference between tattling to get others in trouble and when it is important to speak up. When kids give advice to tattletales, they just might take their own advice to heart.

If you liked the above parenting tips, pick up the Dilemma Discussion Kit with its 50 Dilemmas at http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/parent_resource_center.asp?pr_id=kd010

Subscribe to our Free Parenting Newsletter at http://www.KidsDiscuss.com and you'll receive 80 bonding activities to share with your kids.

How do you discuss problems with your kids? Let me know by emailing me at http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/contact.asp . When I receive your tip, I'll send you a surprise.

Here's to your parenting success,

Jean Tracy, MSS

 

 

 

 


Parenting Skills ~ How to Praise Your Child with Affirmations

"Building Character Starts with Getting Your Kids To Talk."

Parenting Tips by Jean Tracy, MSS, for grades K-6:

Parenting Skills – This Parenting Tip comes from our Parent Affirmations Kit:

All parents love their kids. Many don't know how to show it. If you have trouble showing affection consider the tip below from our 75 affirmations in our Parent Affirmations Kit at www.KidsDiscuss.com

"I delight in your laughter because…"

Your fun challenge is to finish the above affirmation with specific endings like:

  • "I delight in your laughter because you make up your own jokes."
  • "I delight in your laughter because your giggles make me laugh too."
  • "I delight in your laughter because your humor fills me with sunshine."

Guess what? Beginning with the words "I delight…," delights your child too.

When you praise your child, don't be surprised if your child:

  • Makes up more jokes to delight you.
  • Finds ways to make you laugh even more.
  • Strives to bring you more sunshine with humor.

Parenting Skills Conclusion:

Children, like adults, love praise. Why not increase the sunshine in your house with laughter and praise?

If you liked this tip why not subscribe to our FREE Parenting Newsletter at http://www.KidsDiscuss.com and receive 80 fun activities to share with your kids?

Pick up our Parent Affirmation Kit at http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/parent_resource_center.asp?pr_id=kd009 too. Your child will bask in your love.

How do you compliment your child? Email me at http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/contact.asp . When I receive your tip, I'll send you a surprise.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 


Parenting Skills Blog ~ These Communication Tips Work!

"Building Character Starts with Getting Your Kids To Talk."

Parenting Tips by Jean Tracy, MSS, for grades K-6:

This Parenting Tip comes from our Parenting Skills Kit:

Communicating with kids is hard when they're acting sassy, yelling, hitting, or won't budge when you tell them to do their chores. Sometimes you need the patience of a saint to keep your cool.

Parenting Skill for Communicating with Respect:

Even when your child is disrespectful toward you, be the elegant parent. Elegance keeps you in control of your emotions. Elegance is refusing seek revenge by yelling, hitting, or acting like your child.

Why be elegant? You are the parent. You are the teacher. You are training your child to be a civilized person.

3 Parenting Skills for Communicating Respect in the Heat of Battle:

  1. If you speak, use a respectful tone. Be firm and use few words. For example:

    "You don't want to make your bed and I want you to make it." Notice the word "and." This word lessens the battle. Using the word, "but," fuels the fight and keeps it going.

  2. Turn your body away from your from your disrespectful child and ignore. Your child wants to get you to fight. It's hard for your child to win a fight when you won't participate.
  3. Send your disrespectful child to Time Out. Avoid screaming in the process. Remember to ask your child before releasing her, "Why were you sent to Time Out?" If your child says, "I don't know," have her return to Time Out until she tells you.

Parenting Skills Conclusion:

By remembering to be elegant, you are teaching your child to communicate with respect. You are the model for your child's future behavior. I know it's hard. I know you may have to model your elegance a thousand times. I also know you can do it.

How do you speak respectfully to your child? Let me know by emailing me at http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/contact.asp . When I receive your tip, I'll send you a surprise.

Jean Tracy, MSS publishes a Free Parenting Newsletter. Subscribe at http://www.KidsDiscuss.com and you'll receive 80 bonding activities to share with your kids.

Treat yourself to our Parenting Skills Kit at http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/parent_resource_center.asp?pr_id=kd003 and find out other ways to be the parent you dreamed of being before you had kids.

 

 

 

 

 


Social Skills for Kids ~ This Parenting Tip Teaches Friendliness to Kids

"Building Character Starts with Getting Your Kids To Talk."

Parenting Tips by Jean Tracy, MSS, for grades K-6:

This Parenting Tip comes from our Social Skills Kit for Kids with its 50 social skills for making friends. Many kids lack the experience to know how to be liked. Some brag, others give little gifts, and others are too shy to try.

Social Skills Tip of the Day:

Tell your child, "Whether you see a friend, a kid you don't know well, or a kid you'd like to know, say "Hi" with a smile. Here's why:

  • You'll make the other kid feel important.
  • Your pleasant "Hi" and smile will show the other kid you are friendly.
  • You'll feel great because you were friendly and said "Hi."

Why It's Hard to be Friendly Kid:

  • Kids fear they might look foolish.
  • The other kid might not say "Hi!" in return.
  • Kids fear they might be rejected.

Prepare your child to expect that not all kids will say "Hi!" in return. Perhaps they are having a bad day. Maybe they're too shy. Maybe they don't know how to be friendly in return. Make sure your child understands it is not his fault when kids don't act friendly in return.

How do you help your child make friends? Let me know by emailing me at http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/contact.asp . When I receive your tip, I'll send you a surprise.

Jean Tracy, MSS publishes a Free Parenting Newsletter. Subscribe at http://www.KidsDiscuss.com and you'll receive 80 bonding activities to share with your kids.

Treat yourself and your kids to our Social Skills Kit for Kids at http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/parent_resource_center.asp?pr_id=kd011