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Child Discipline ~ 3 Logical Consequences for Stopping Sibling Rivalry

Do your kids fight? Do you nag them to stop? It's frustrating isn't it? Inside you will find three ways to stop sibling rivalry.

Having raised two boys, I know the problems when kids fight. These three logical consequences helped save my sanity. Why not try them too?

Child Discipline:

  1. Send the child who punched the other to Time Out. Don't allow him to come out until he can admit why he was sent there.
  2. Have the punching child apologize sincerely to the other sibling and do the apologizing in front of you.
  3. If both kids were punching then send them to separate boring rooms (laundry room, bathroom, etc.) and not come out until they each think of three ways they could have handled it better. This means they need to come and tell you. Then they act out the best way. Next they need to shake each others' hands.

When I used the 3rd consequence, in the end they often chose to go off and play together. I believe some fighting between siblings prepares them for the future. Having them admit their wrongdoing, apologize, and figure out 3 better ways to treat each other prepares them for the future even more.

Become an exceptional parent. Subscribe to my Free Parenting Newsletter and receive 80 fun activities to share with your kids at:

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If you liked the above tips, and want to raise kids with character, discover my Problem Solver Kit. It will help you stop sibling rivalry. You don't have to tear your hair out. You don't have to nag or lecture. Pick up my creative solutions for kids who fight at:

Problem Solver Kit

Send me your parenting questions and I'll send you a parenting surprise. Just email your question to:

Jean Tracy's Email

 With warm wishes for your parenting success,

Jean

Jean Tracy, MSS

   

 


Character Building – This Chore Teaches Your Kids to Be Responsible

"Building Character Starts with Getting Your Kids To Talk."

Do you have second, third, or fourth grade child? Could he use a little character building? Would you like to teach him a chore he could use for life? How about teaching him to sweep the kitchen? Perhaps you'll want him to sweep after dinner, before company comes, or as part of his Saturday work. He's old enough to handle a broom, sweep out the corners, and create a pile to pick up with the dust pan. Teach your child to become competent at sweeping. He'll be able to sweep bathrooms, front door entrances, and steps too.

First, take the time to show him how. You may have to help him with the first few tries. Don't' forget to check his work. Praise him for what he does well. If he overlooked something in the corner, ask him about the dust bunny he left behind. Don't criticize. Let him pick it up.

Wouldn't it be nice to let your child do the sweeping? Wouldn't you like help with this chore? All it takes in the beginning is your time, patience, and praise.

One more thing, he'll become competent at a chore he can use throughout his life. He'll become more responsible and build character too. Try it and let me know the results.

If you liked this tip, consider picking up my kit with age-appropriate chores and a chore chart. . You'll find it exclusively at:

The Chore Chart Kit

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Send me a parenting question and I'll send you a parenting surprise. Just email me your question to:

Jean Tracy's Email

Best wishes for your parenting success,

Jean

Jean Tracy, MSS


Building Character ~ 3 Rules and One Example for Discussing Dilemmas with Kids

"Building Character Starts with Getting Your Kids To Talk."

Parenting Tips by Jean Tracy, MSS, for grades K-6:

Dear Parent,

When you have good relationships, with your children, they confide in you. When they confide in you, you become their confidant. This offers you the ability to influence their lives when they need your influence most. That's why I developed the Dilemma Discussion Kit with its 51 dilemmas to discuss with your kids. The dilemmas don't accuse your child about anything. In fact, the problems are about a make believe child. Use them and find out how discussions with your kids can be real eye-openers.

When you share the make believe problems in the kit with your child, you give them the opportunity to share their moral thinking too. You'll learn if your family values are getting through to your child. Here are 3 rules for you:

  • Listen without criticism
  • Compliment their good thinking.
  • Get advice to say later, if you need it, from trusted adults.

An Example to Ask and Discuss with Your Child:

"Pretend your friend's mother told you she is sick of her son's whining. When he whines, you notice that she gives him everything he wants. What advice would you like to give his mother?"

See how non-threatening an example like this can be? Make sure the problems you discuss are not directly related to your child's behavior or he'll shut down. Treasure what you learn. Don't condone immoral thinking. Take time to think things through that you consider wrong before you comment. It could take you a couple of days for you to think about the best approach before you respond.

Consider This Approach for Returning to the Discussion:

"Remember when we discussed the problem with the whining boy and you said his mother should spank him every time he whines? Spanking might not be the best approach. Can you think of something that might fit the boys whining behavior?" If he can't, this is where you might offer suggestions to discuss.

Keep things simple. You'll be a great confidant if you do.

Be an exceptional parent. Subscribe to my Free Parenting Newsletter and receive 80 fun activities to share with your kids at:

http://www.KidsDiscuss.com

 

If you liked the above tips, and want to raise kids with character, consider dilemma discussions. Let my kit help you. Pick it up at:

Dilemma Discussion Kit

 

Send me your parenting questions and I'll send you a parenting surprise. Just email your question to:

Jean Tracy's Email

 

With warm wishes for your parenting success,

Jean

Jean Tracy, MSS