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Building Character with Logical Child Discipline

Dear Parent,

Would you like to build character in your kids when you discipline them? Are you afraid you're too harsh or too easy? Would you like to discipline with logic? Inside you'll find 3 common problems and 3 logical ways to handle them.

Discipline Problem and Its Solution # 1 ~ your children fight over which TV program to watch.

Consider turning off the TV for a day. Your children will need to find something else to do. Hopefully, it won't be computer games.

Discipline Problem and Its Solution #2 ~ your child waves sharp scissors around recklessly.

Consider taking the sharp scissors away and handing your child blunt tipped scissors young children use. This can be a good alternative when your child needs scissors for homework projects.

Discipline Problem and Its Solution # 3 ~ your child ignores your commands to "get off the phone."

Consider taking phone privileges away for 1 or 2 days. This might be difficult if you work outside the home and the phone is available when you're not there. In that case, take the phone privileges away when you are home.

Building Character with Logical Consequences Conclusion:

Perhaps you noticed each problem had a logical consequence. Each problem had a direct solution connected to the misbehavior. It wouldn't be logical if your child didn't get off the phone when you asked and you told your child to walk the dog as a punishment. Walking the dog has no direct consequence to your child hanging up the phone.

I know it isn't easy to always find a logical consequence when disciplining your child. You'll need to stop and think before you speak. Ask yourself, "What consequence fits this misbehavior?" You'll almost always come up with a good solution.

Become an exceptional parent. Subscribe to my Free Parenting Newsletter and receive 80 fun activities to share with your kids at:

http://www.KidsDiscuss.com

If you liked the above tips, and want to raise your child with a positive character, discover the Parenting Skills Kit. It has parenting skills and encouragement for you when handling your kids. There's a "discipline stick" inside it too. It helps parents worldwide teach family values. Pick it up at:

Parenting Skills Kit

 Send me your parenting questions and I'll send you a parenting surprise. Just email your question to:

Jean Tracy's Email

 With warm wishes for your parenting success,

Jean

Jean Tracy, MSS


Building Character with Chores for Kids

Dear Parent,

Would you like to build character in your kids through chores? Would you like your family to become a team and work together? Do you know how? Inside you will find 3 household chores for 9 and 10-year-olds.

Teach your boys and girls to wash and dry their clothes:

First, they'll need to collect their dirty clothes in one place like basket in their closet or a hamper.

Second, teach them how to fold their clothes. You might have to show them how several times.

Third, make sure they have a place to put their clean clothes and teach your children how to arrange them. It's as easy as that.

After they know how, expect them to follow through and take care of their own clothes. I know teaching your children to wash and dry clothes, fold their laundry, and put their laundry takes time. Yet in the end you'll save bundles of time because you're not doing their work. You'll be teaching them responsibility, a sense of order, and how to take care of themselves. They'll be learning these positive skills for life. You'll be building character with chores. The family work load will lessen for you too.

Become an exceptional parent. Subscribe to my Free Parenting Newsletter and receive 80 fun activities to share with your kids at:

http://www.KidsDiscuss.com

If you liked the above tips, and want to raise your child with a positive character, discover the Chore Chart Kit. It has age appropriate chores for your kids. It helps parents worldwide teach family values. It can help your work together too. Pick it up at:

Chore Chart Kit

 Send me your parenting questions and I'll send you a parenting surprise. Just email your question to:

Jean Tracy's Email

 With warm wishes for your parenting success,

Jean

Jean Tracy, MSS

 


Building Character ~ 3 Dilemmas to Discuss with Your Kids

Would you like to know your kids' attitudes about life? Would like to tips on how to ask them? If you'd like to hear their eager opinions, consider dilemma discussions.

3 Dilemmas to Discuss with Your Kids:

  1. Pretend no one wants to play with you because you cheat to win. What advice would you give yourself?

    Many kids cheat to win. (Some adults do too.) They think winning is more important than anything. Here is your chance to get your children to talk. They might tell you why they don't like playing with cheaters. Help them examine the problems with cheating. Listen to their advice. Congratulations! You've just helped them think about right and wrong.

     

  2. Imagine your brother just told his teacher your parents had a fight last night. Should you tell your parents what he said? Why or why not?

    Lots of kids have loose lips. Lots of kids tell secrets that belong at home. Many can't tell the difference between appropriate and inappropriate things to say. Here's another chance to help your children discuss the difference.

     

  3. Pretend your brother brags about everything. Nobody likes his bragging. Most of the kids won't play with him. How can you help him without getting him mad at you?

    So many children think kids will like them if they prove how important they are. Some of them lie to impress others. This is an amazing opportunity to discuss your kids' opinions. It's also a great time to talk about the problems with bragging.

When children are given the chance, they love to give their opinions. It helps them feel valued. Why not learn your kids' attitudes about life? Enjoy helping them think right about wrong. Feel good about the lively discussions too.

Become an exceptional parent. Subscribe to my Free Parenting Newsletter and receive 80 fun activities to share with your kids at:

http://www.KidsDiscuss.com

If you liked the above tips, and want to raise your child with a positive character, discover my Dilemma Discussion Kit. It has 51 dilemmas to discuss with your kids. It helps parents worldwide teach family values. It can help you too. Pick it up at:

Dilemma Discussion Kit.

 Send me your parenting questions and I'll send you a parenting surprise. Just email your question to:

Jean Tracy's Email

 With warm wishes for your parenting success,

Jean

Jean Tracy, MSS


Family Values ~ 3 Ways Family Meetings Teach Family Values

Dear Parents,

Do your children express your family values? Or are you worried about their attitudes? Inside you'll find out how family meetings can help.

Today let's look at how family meetings teach your children the values you hold dear. Discussions are the key.

3 Ways Family Meetings Teach Family Values:

  1. Let's say your 8 year old leaves his toys and clothes all over the house. In family meetings you can ask each member what they think of leaving clothes and toys around. Find out what each would do to get a messy person to pick up after himself. Listen especially to your 8-year-old. Ask him to make a commitment to pick up his things and write it down. Post it on the refrigerator.

     

  2. Imagine your 11-year-old had the neighbor kids in the house when neither parent was home. More importantly he lied about it. The family meeting is the perfect place to discuss how lying breaks down trust. Again ask your 11-year-old to make a commitment to tell the truth. Write it down and post it on refrigerator as a reminder.

     

  3. Pretend your 6-year-old swears using vulgar words when playing outside. The family meeting is a great place to discuss the family's views on swearing. Ask your 6-year-old to make a commitment to used better language. Write it down and post it on the refrigerator.

Can you see how the family meeting is better than lecturing, yelling, or nagging your kids to act better? At the family meeting you can take the time to discuss problems, get everyone's viewpoint, and make plans to improve. Besides making commitments to make the family better, you can chart the better behavior and give rewards too. The family meeting is a super way to teach your family values and build character. Give the family meeting a try. If you'd like to have a book filled with ready-made family meetings to fill in, pick up The Family Meeting Diary .It will become a treasured keepsake of what your family said and did.

With warm wishes for your parenting success,

Jean

Become an exceptional parent. Subscribe to my Free Parenting Newsletter and receive 80 fun activities to share with your kids at:

http://www.KidsDiscuss.com

Download my Free E-book and discover great advice from parents, counselors, and teachers at:

Parenting Tips – 21 of the Best

You'll find the Free E-book at the top of the page.

Send me your parenting questions and I'll send you a parenting surprise. Just email your question to:

Jean Tracy's Email

 With warm wishes for your parenting success,

Jean

Jean Tracy, MSS