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3 Parenting Solutions for Ending Childhood Stealing

Parenting Skills Blog shares character, parenting, and family solutions from Jean Tracy, MSS ~ Website ~ www.KidsDiscuss.com

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Is your kid's character heading toward jail?  Is stealing becoming a problem? Although many kids steal something, the trick is knowing how to stop it. Look inside for some parenting tips on what to do.

Building Character with An Excerpt from BackTalk Street and "Thelma the Thief," page 39

...Thelma watched her mother back out the driveway. 'Now's my chance,' she thought. Thelma snuck into her parents' bedroom. She pocketed a twenty-dollar bill from her step-dad's dresser. 'I don't wait,' thought Thelma, 'I just take."

"What were you doing in mom and dad's room?" quizzed Peter.

Thelma jumped. She thought to herself, 'I didn't know he was home.' Her mind raced for an answer. "None of your business," she hissed.

Although Thelma acted tough, her heart pumped hard and fast as she headed back to her room.

Parents, stealing is like a cat on the hunt. It crouches down, looks, listens, and when the moment seems right, it pounces on its prey. Thelma watched her mother drive away. She thought she was alone.  Thelma snuck into her parents' bedroom. Carefully, she opened her step-dad's drawer and took the money.

If you catch your child stealing at home, don't be surprised if she's taking things from classmates and friends. In Thelma's case her mother looked under Thelma's bed and was shocked. At school, Tilly the Tattle revealed Thelma's secret.

Kids who take from others have to be sneaky. They feel fear and they can't play openly with the toys they steal. They may become cranky and secretive.

Don't let this happen to your child. Be alert. Consider what you can do to help.

3 Parenting Questions for Stopping Your Child from Stealing

Gather your kids together. Read a story like Thelma's. Then discuss these questions:

1. Has anyone ever stolen your things? If so, how did you feel?

2. Why is earning what you want better than stealing?

3. What advice would you give kids who steal?

Even if your child doesn't steal, stories like Thelma's can boost their moral values. When they discuss the questions with you, they think about right and wrong. You help them form their character. 

Some say that children who steal toys and money are seeking things to fill the emptiness in their hearts. As parents, let's give our kids the love they really want before stealing becomes a habit.

If you'd like a copy of Thelma's story and 14 others with  puzzles and stickers, go to BackTalk Street It's now available as an instant download.

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How do you get your child to change? Or do you have a question? Please share in the comment box below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Parenting Tips ~ What Greedy Kids Really Need!

Parenting Skills Blog shares character, parenting, and family solutions from Jean Tracy, MSS ~ Website ~ www.KidsDiscuss.com

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Parents, are your kids greedy?  If you're child says "I want, I want, I want" in stores, at TV Ads, or wherever you go, she probably is. Find out what your child really wants and what you can do.

Building Character with An Excerpt from BackTalk Street and "Gretta The Greedy," page 33

..."That's a new bike. When did you get it?" asked Thelma.

"This morning. I know how to get everything I want," bragged Gretta.

"How?" asked Tilly.

"When I watch toy commercials or go to the store with mom, I say, 'I want this, or Can I have that?' When I really try hard, I say 'Please, please, please' in a very sweet voice. If that doesn't work, I get mad and pout."

Parents, greed is like a bottomless pit. Gretta had an unending appetite for things.  She expected her mom to give her everything she wanted. But things didn't make her happy and she kept begging for more.

When parents try to satisfy their child's every want, they teach selfishness. They raise their child to be short-sighted, to only see 'myself and me.' There's no room for others.

3 Parenting Tips for Helping Greedy Children to Change

1. Don't give in. Your child must learn that begging and pouting won't work.

2. Discuss a story like Gretta's. Here are some questions to ask:

a. What do you think Gretta really needs from her mom?

b. Pretend you are Gretta's mom. What advice would you give Gretta?

c. Imagine, if every child grew up greedy, what would the world be like?

3. If your child is greedy, consider replacing material things with simple no-cost fun together. (Get these 80 Fun Activities to Share with Your Kids at http://www.KidsDiscuss.com and my free Parenting Newsletter.)

Parents, your goal is to teach your kids the importance of relationships and loving others more than things. Like a wise guru repeat these simple words to your child often:

"Only love can fill an empty heart."

Discuss what you mean. If you do, your child's vision may begin to see and value others over wanting things.

What do you think about giving kids everything they want? Please comment on the comment link below: 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Parents, If Your Kids Whine, Learn 3 Solutions

This Parenting Skills Blog from Jean Tracy, MSS and www.KidsDiscuss.com presents character, parenting and family solutions.

 

 

When kids whine, parents cringe. If you have a whiner in your family, look for 3 solutions from BackTalk Street and Winnie the Whiner.

Character Building Story ~ An Excerpt from Winnie the Whiner, page 27:

"You make me do everything," whined Winnie.

"I just asked you to make your bed, Winnie," her mom replied.

"I can't." Winnie moaned. "I don't know how."

"Winnie, I've shown you a hundred times. Just do as you're told."

"Show me again," whined Winnie.

Mrs. Washington sighed and showed Winnie again. As she hurried out of Winnie's room, Mrs. Washington thought, 'I can't stand Winnie's whining.'

Winnie pouted on the outside but smiled on the inside. Once again she didn't have to make her bed.

'I won.' she thought.

Why Parents Give in and Whiner's Win:

Winnie's shrill whine sounded like the screeching of a power saw that wouldn't stop. Her mother welcomed it like a swarm of bees. To turn Winnie off, her mother gave in. Giving in guaranteed more whining from Winnie.

How Parents Build Character and Turn Whining Off:

1. Tell your child to draw Winnie's whining face. Discuss her picture.

2. Tell your child to role play speaking nicely. Discuss how speaking nicely is different from whining.

3. Read stories like Winnie's and ask these questions:

a. How do you feel when kids whine?

b. Why is talking in a pleasant voice better than whining?

c. What advice would you give to kids who whine?

Listen, whining irritates most parents. Your goal is to teach your child to talk in a pleasant voice. Don't give in. Teach your Winnie that whining won't work. If you do, Winnie's power saw will stop screeching. You won't feel attacked by a swarm of bees either.

If you like these ideas, download BackTalk Street for ready stories, discussion questions, and fun puzzles to solve.

I'm also giving you free access to my 80 Fun Activities to Play with Your Kids and my Free Parenting Newsletter at: http://www.KidsDiscuss.com 

Does your child whine? How does whining make you feel? Click on the comment link below and share your feelings.

 

 


How to Help Your Kids Clean Up Bad Language

This Parenting Skills Blog from Jean Tracy, MSS and www.KidsDiscuss.com presents character, parenting, and family solutions.

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Parents, are you ever shocked by your child? Does he cuss, swear, and put kids down? Look inside for 4 solutions from Character Building on BackTalk Street.

Character Building from BackTalk Street and An Exerpt from Cory the Cussor:

"Hey, Stink Bomb!" yelled Cory from the twins' upstairs window. Bubba looked up just as Cory called down, "Bubba, you are such a dork!"

Cory's heart raced and his face turned red as he remembered how Bubba had made fun of Billy. He remembered how everyone on the bus laughted at his twin. he remembered the tears starting behind Billy's glasses. 'It isn't Billy's fault he needs glasses.' He looked down at Bubba.

'Bubba, you're going to pay.' Cory tossed the juice from his glass and, Bingo! It landed on Bubba's head. Bubba rolled up his sleeves.

"Come down here, Cory, you coward!"

"Why should I, Puke Face?" laughed Cory.

Just then, Bubba's mother called..."

The Problem with Kids and Cussing:

Cussing broadcasts disrespect. It burns the speaker and the victim. Friendships turn to ashes. In this story, Cory wanted revenge. He burned his bridges with Bubba. Will they ever be friends?

Some kids laugh at cussing. Others are shocked. Most fear being the victim.

To help your child think more deeply about the problem with cussing read discussion stories like "Cory the Cusser" from BackTalk Street, p. 21.

4 Discussion Questions for Parents and Kids:

1. Why do you think kids cuss?

2. How do you feel when kids cuss at you?

3. Do you ever use cuss words? Why?

4. What advice would you give kids who cuss?

Parents, many people do a little cussing. If your child cusses a lot he may be enjoying the attention. He may not realize he's broadcasting disrespect and like a boomerang it will come back to hurt his reputation.

To help your child discuss the problem with cussing, why not use the power of stories like "Cory the Cusser?" Feel free to pick up BackTalk Street for good stories that help your child think right about wrong. He'll enjoy the puzzles too.

I invite you to claim your free access to my 80 Fresh Activities to Play with Your Kids and my Free Parenting Newsletter at http://www.KidsDiscuss.com

Do you have a child who burns friendships with cussing? How have you handled it. Click on the comment link below and add your thoughts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


3 Parenting Tips ~ How to Deal with Tattletales

Parenting Skills Blog from Jean Tracy, MSS and www.KidsDiscuss.com shares Character, Parenting, and Family Solutions.

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Character Building from BackTalk Street and An Excerpt from Tilly the Tattle:

Does your tattletale challenge your parenting skills? Does the sound of her voice frazzle your nerves? Look inside for 3 solutions from BackTalk Street.

"Miss Kellogg! Miss Kellogg! Gabby threw her lunch away," tattled Tilly. Her teacher sighed deeply.

"Tilly, mind your own business and finish your homework."

Gabby giggled. Cory and Billy chanted in whispers,

"Tilly's a tattle.

 Tilly's a tattle."

During recess Tilly walked around the playground by herself. She watched her classmates, and reported all problems to Miss Kellogg.

After recess, Tilly raised her hand.

"Yes, Tilly, what is it?"

"Chester and Peter were fighting on the playground," she tattled.

How Parents and Teachers Can Deal with Tattletales:

Let's face it. Tattling is like an unpleasant squawk. It can crow a little and irritate a lot. So what can you do? Consider discussion stories like the excerpt from BackTalk Street.

Kids love to share their ideas about difficult behaviors. Tattling is definitely such a behavior. Whether your kids are tattletales or not, they certainly love giving their opinions. Discussion stories may help them change or avoid the behavior too.

Parents, here are 3 three discussion questions to ask about tattling:

1. How do kids feel about tattletales? Why?
2. Do you ever tattle? Why?
3. What advice would you give at tattletale?

Why not end your discussion with having your kids draw two pictures:

One of Tilly tattling and the other of the kids reacting to Tilly.

Parents, you must clarify the difference between tattling and telling:

Tattling is about getting siblings in trouble and getting attention. Telling is about helping a sibling avoid or get out of danger.

To help your child discuss the problems with tattling, why not use the power of stories like Tilly the Tattle. Feel free to pick up BackTalk Street for ready stories, discussion questions, and puzzles at:

http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/parent_resource_center.asp?pr_id=kd001

 I invite you to claim your free access to my 80 Fun Activities to Share with Your Kids and my Free Parenting Newsletter at http://www.KidsDiscuss.com

Do you have a tattletale that squawks a lot? How do you handle the squawking? Click on the comment link below and tell us what you do.

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 


Parenting ~ Helping Kids with Bullying Through the Power of Stories

Parenting Skills Blog from Jean Tracy, MSS and www.KidsDiscuss.com shares Character, Parenting, and Family Solutions.

 

Is your child a bully or a victim? How could stories help both? Let's look inside to see how stories help your kids think about bullying.

Character Building from BackTalk Street and An Exerpt from Bubba the Bully:

Bubba's mouth could be heard throughout the bus. As Billy sat down Bubba yelled out,

"Bug-eyed Billy,

Is a dilly,

With his four eyes

He looks silly!"

Billy looked out the window while Bubba and his noisy friends laughed. To Billy their laughter sounded scary like thunder. 'I can't help wearing glasses,' thought Billy. 'I wish Mom had taken me to school.' Tears steamed his glasses.

Tilly the Tatttle, who sat next to Billy, noticed his glasses and said nothing.

What's Wrong with Bullies?:

Like the Wizard of Oz, Bubba the Bully, is a fake. He hides behind a curtain of stinging words. Bubba got his power by scaring his victims.Kids fear him and would rather be his friend than be bullied by him.

In the book, BackTalk Street, parents read Bubba's whole story to their children. The questions that follow help kids discuss the problems with bullies and victims. Kids use their rational minds and caring feelings to answer the questions like:

1. Why do you think some kids bully other kids?

2. What did Bubba need to learn about the feelings of the kids he put down?

3. How do you feel when you are put down?

4.Why is being kind to others better than being a bully?

5. What advice would you give a bully? 

Fun drawing, puzzles  to unscramble, words to find, and Bubba the Bully's Maze add to children's enjoyment and increase their their thinking about bullying.

How Parents Can Help Kids Think about Bullying:

To help your child discuss the problems with bullying, why not use the power of stories like Bubba the Bully. Feel free to pick up BackTalk Street for ready stories, discussion questions, and puzzles at:

http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/parent_resource_center.asp?pr_id=kd001

 I invite you to claim your free access to my 80 Fun Activities to Share with Your Kids and my Free Parenting Newsletter at http://www.KidsDiscuss.com

Have your kids been bullied? What did you do about it? Share your information on the comment link below.




3 Character Tips ~ How Parents Help Kids Stop the Blame Game

Parenting Skills Blog Shares Character, Parenting, and Family Solutions from Jean Tracy, MSS ~ Website ~ www.KidsDiscuss.com

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Does your child blame others when he’s at fault? Are you afraid for his character? Let’s look inside to see how stories can help.

Billy the Blamer’s Story from BackTalk Street:

Billy crunched his corn flakes while watching cartoons. Panic, the cat, ran across the TV screen. Billy’s mom called from the bedroom, “Hurry Billy! Your school bus is almost here!”

“Billy!” yelled 2 year-old Brian. He held up a book bag for Billy to take.
“Hey! Give me that you stupid brat!” As Billy grabbed for his bag, he spilled his milk and soaked his pants.

“Now look what you did you stupid kid!” (An episode from Billy the Blamer – one of the kids on Back Talk Street.)

“Stories, because of their hold on the imagination, can create an attachment to goodness.”- William Kilpatrick

Imagine reading Billy the Blamer’s whole story to your child. You'll both have fun and you'll strengthen his character. Why? Because he'll be thinking about blaming too.

3 Essential Character Building Tips for You to Ask Your Kids:

1. If you asked Billy, “What’s wrong with blaming others for your own mistakes?” what do you think he would say?

2. How do you think other kids feel when he blames them? Why?

3. What advice would you give Billy?


The goal of the story is to stir your child’s imagination, think through the questions, and create an attachment to goodness.

Of course, like most stories, there’s more to Billy’s blaming than meets the eye. Only his friend, Tilly the Tattle, knows the whole truth.

Your Action Step:

Read your children stories. Ask them questions like the ones above to help them think. This is the fun way to build character. Tell us your experiences by clicking on the comment link below.

What tool do you use to build character in your kids? Please share and help us all by clicking on the comments link below.

Pick up BackTalk Street now and build character with its stories, questions, and puzzles at:

http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/parent_resource_center.asp?pr_id=kd001

I also invite you to pick up 80 fun activities to share with your kids with our FREE Parenting Newsletter at:

http://www.KidsDiscuss.com