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Arguments with Teens: Can They be Helpful?

Mother and Daughter Argument
  How Can Parent-Teen Arguments Be Good?

If you're arguing with your teen and are frustrated, you might not need to be. Our parenting expert and coach, Lorraine Segal, has researched why arguing can be a good thing for your teen. Let's find out what she's learned in her article, Parent-Teen Disagreements Have Positive Results.  

If you find yourself in frequent arguments with your teen—take heart. According to a newly published study, the right kind of disagreement may help a teen ‘just say no’ to peers when pressured to use drugs or be sexually active.

The longitudinal study at the University of Virginia looked at a diverse group of 150 teens at ages 13, 15, and 16, and asked questions of the teens, their peers, and parents about the teen’s substance use, interactions with mothers, social skills, and friendships. Researchers also observed the teens interacting with family members.

The results of the study indicate that teens who “openly expressed their viewpoints” and “held their own” in discussions with their mothers were also more likely to resist peer pressure to use drugs or alcohol or become sexually active.  The researchers particularly mentioned teens who could effectively use “reasoned arguments” to change parents’ minds about such topics as friends, grades, chores and house rules.

In contrast, teens who tried to use “pressure, whining, or insults” to get their way or those who gave in immediately without arguing, were more likely to give in to peer pressure as well.

Most people, unless conflict resolution professionals, tend to think that all conflict is bad. Parents can see their kids “talking back” as a sign of failure. On the contrary, when teens learn to stand up for a position and negotiate solutions, the skills learned carry over into better decision-making about sex, drugs, and alcohol, issues that deeply concern parents.

As a coach and mediator who helps teens and adults gain skills for communicating effectively, I often tell clients that conflict can have positive outcomes. It is challenging for parents and teens to figure out how to navigate difficult conversations successfully, but if they begin with love and a willingness to truly listen to each other, the result is far better than either yelling and dictating or just giving in.

By the way, the study said nothing about who “won” the argument. It was a respectful, effective style of communicating that made the difference for the teens.

For article research sources go to: 

http://conflictremedy.com/2012/01/06/parent-teen-disagreements-have-positive-results/

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Lorraine Segal  Applause_18229118

Lorraine Segal   

Let's give Lorraine a BIG HAND for her research on this topic. You gave us an excellent article, Lorraine.

To contact Lorraine go to: http://www.conflictremedy.com/ You can reach her at (707) 236-8079, lorraine@conflictremedy.com        

Through her business, Conflict Remedy, Lorraine Segal, provides communication coaching and mediation for parents, teens, couples and  people in organizations. Services available by telephone and Skype, as well as face to face in Santa Rosa, California. 

Bonus Article:

Child Discipline Tips –How to Discipline Kids without Arguments

Parents, it's your turn to take the stage:

What are your opinions about this blog post or your suggestions for helping your kids? Please answer in the comment link below.

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With warm wishes,

Jean Tracy, MSS

Sign up for my FREE Parenting Newsletter and receive 80 fun activities to share with your kids.

******If you liked this article, please send it to your social media sites below.


5 Parenting Tips: What You Need for Your Newborn Baby

If you're a parent getting ready for your newborn, do you have what you need? Our guest blogger, Mike Hawks, from Austraila, is here to share what you need from his article, 5 Things to Do When Your Baby is Born. Let's hear his advice.

Baby touching nose
   What Parents Need for their Newborns

Babies are absolutely lovable, but their care is one of the scariest things for many mothers. There are many aspects to look after for which you need to purchase various things. Many mothers often purchase numerous useless items, which serve no purpose after they have used it once.

As a mom, you will have to address various needs of your child. During the early days, your child will have a similar routine, such as feeding, sleeping and frequent change of diapers.

The other two significant things you should consider are bathing and travelling. You need to get yourself prepared for many things well in advance for all these things.

In this article, you will find 5 useful tips to follow when your baby is born. Maintain all the below mentioned requisitions in sufficient quantity.

1. Diapers and Other Items: You will need diapers the most along with other things. Many moms choose to purchase disposable nappies, whereas if you are environmentally cautious, you can also opt for green disposable diapers.

2. Baby Skin Products: Pile up stocks of cotton balls, diaper ointments and wipes to take good care of your baby’s skin. Newborn babies have extremely sensitive and soft skin so you must ensure you keep bacteria away.

Some moms also prefer using washcloth and warm water in place of wipes to avoid their fragrance and harsh chemicals. The good news is that there are many fragrance and chemical free diapers available now. Change the diapers often, as extreme dryness and air blockage can rupture the skin.

3. Baby Cribs: Babies sleep up to sixteen hours in a day during their early months. So as your newborn will spend most of the time sleeping, you should invest in a quality baby crib. Ensure it is set properly at the correct place. The mattress should be parallel without any excess bedding.

However, you should remember never to use a pillow for an infant until the age of 12 months.

4. Baby Feeding Bottles: Babies require feeding after every two hours. Demand feeding is a good approach, but you should also develop a free-feeding routine in conjunction to keep the baby’s digestive system regulated. Ensure the baby burps because it releases the air taken from the bottle.

Boil the bottle parts regularly to avoid bacteria from accumulating. Preferably, purchase 3 to 4 baby feeding bottles as you will need one while cleaning the other. One spare bottle set should always be there for emergency needs.

5. Sterilizer: Sterilizers are really beneficial for your newborn’s hygiene. You can clean up those milk bottles in the sterilizer very easily. You do not need to spend a huge sum of money on a sterilizer, purchase an average-priced steam sterilizer and cleaning brush.

There are various types of sterilizer available, purchase the one that includes bottle brushes for easy use. However, if you want to purchase a sterilizer without a brush, make sure you purchase bottle brushes that go along with the sterilizer.

Let's give a big THANK YOU to Mike for his parenting tips. They will help many parents get ready with the right equipment for their new babies.

Jack Neil      Applause_18229118

Mike Hawks


You may connect with Mike at: www.toysparadise.com.au

 Bonus Article: Motivation – 5 Ways Parents Can Motivate Pre-School Kids

 Parents, it's your turn to take the stage:

What are your opinions about this blog post or your suggestions for helping your kids? Please answer in the comment link below.

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With warm wishes,

Jean Tracy, MSS

Sign up for my FREE Parenting Newsletter and receive 80 fun activities to share with your kids.

******If you liked this article, please send it to your social media sites below.


How to Boost Character and Potential in Kids with 12 Easy Goals

 Girl at Fence
 Goal Setting Begins with What Kids Want to Achieve

If you’d like to boost character in your kids through teaching them goal setting, you’re in for a treat from the Care4hire blog. Keep reading to find 12 ways to teach setting goals to your children.

“You want to teach your kids to set goals, get to work on them, and ultimately achieve them.  How can parents and babysitters help kids with this life lesson?

1. Talk to your kids about the goal setting, progress, and achievement in your own life.

2. Talk with your kids about what goals they would like to set for themselves. Younger kids should have short-term goals. Teens can establish longer-term goals (i.e., college and career planning).

3. Write down the goals you have agreed upon. Each goal should be recorded on a separate piece of paper or poster board.

4. Talk with your kids about what steps they think they need to take to achieve their goals. Each step toward goal achievement should be discussed.

5. On the goal papers or poster boards referenced in #3 above, record the steps to goal achievement. 

6. Post the papers or poster boards in a location that is highly visible to your kids.

7. Periodically review your kids’ progress relative to their goals.

8. Praise your kids when they successfully achieve steps along the way to goal achievement.

9. Encourage your kids (or redirect your kids, depending on the nature of the goal) when steps are not achieved.

10. Periodically review the goals and their steps to ensure that the goals continue to be achievable and that the steps remain the best or most realistic means to achieve the goals. (Note: many young kids lack perseverance.

Don’t let your kids easily wander from one goal to another without goal achievement or a valid reason for the change of heart. For example, if one of your kids set “save money to buy the music box I like” as her goal two months ago, but she’s not made as much money as she wanted so she now wants to abandon that goal for something more fun, perhaps it’s best to allow her to add the fun goal while still pursuing the original goal as well.)

11. If your kids cannot achieve one or more of their goals, do a goal post-mortem. Without being accusatory, try to determine what went wrong and what can be done to ensure that the next goals set will more likely be achieved. (Note: there may need to be consequences for some goals not being achieved. For example, in the examples above, if one of your kids had getting an “all ‘A’ report card” as her goal, but she got two failing grades instead, a consequence may be warranted.)

12. Celebrate with your kids when they achieve their goals. Goal achievement, for most kids, is a reward in itself. However, celebrations in recognition of goal achievement reinforce the benefits of goal achievement. So, have a pizza night and let your kids choose the kind of pizza they want. Or give them an extra hour to stay up one evening. Or celebrate in whatever way you and your kids think best.”

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Let’s give a BIG HAND to Care4hire for these great goal setting ideas.

Applause_18229118

Connect with Care4hire at http://blog.care4hire.com/goals/456 or

www.Care4hire.com

*******

Bonus Article:

Goal-Setting for Kids ~ How This Self-Talk Technique Raises Achieving Kids

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Parents, it's your turn to take the stage:

What are your opinions about this blog post or your suggestions for helping your kids? Please answer in the comment link below.

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With warm wishes,

Jean Tracy, MSS

Sign up for my FREE Parenting Newsletter and receive 80 fun activities to share with your kids.

******If you liked this article, please send it to your social media sites below.


Warning: These Quotes Could Motivate Your Kids!

  IStock_000000547713XHands in SkySmall
               Great Quotes Motivate Kids

If you repeat positive quotes to motivate your kids, they will remember. Your quotes will become part of their self-talk. When times are tough they will hear these quotes in their minds. Such thoughts become the inspiration that keeps them going when they need it.

10 Motivational Quotes to Repeat for Children

1.  "A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step." - Guru Laozi

2.  “The mind is everything: what you think, you become.” – Gautama Buddha

3.  “Our greatest glory is not in falling, but in getting up every time we do. - Confucius

4.  “Strive not to be a success, but rather to be of value.” – Albert Einstein 

5.  “Don’t count the days, make the days count.” – Muhammad Ali

6.  “Remember that not getting what you want is sometimes a wonderful stroke of luck.”     Dalai Lama

7.  “Forget injuries, never forget kindnesses.” - Confucius

8.  “It takes 20 years to build a reputation and five minutes to ruin it. If you think about that you’ll do things differently.” – Warren Buffet

9.  “The human voice can never reach the distance that is covered by the still, small voice of conscience.” - Mahatma Gandhi

10. "It is our choices that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities." – J.K. Rowling

If these quotes reflect what you believe, say them often. If you prefer other quotes, use them. Your good messages are important ways to influence your child’s thoughts. Make them real by discussing each quote’s meaning. Ask your child what she thinks about them too.

Use Motivational Quotes to Inspire Children When They:

  • Lose a game
  • Receive a good grade
  • Need to do homework
  • Make a new friend
  • Win an award
  • Need a hopeful word from you

Beautiful Black Girl

She's Motivated!

Positive sayings repeated often motivate kids to do their best. Such quotes become the strong inner voice to do well throughout their lives. Motivational quotes will help your children become people of character.

Author: Jean Tracy, MSS

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Bonus Article:

Motivation: 10 No-Cost Rewards for Parents to Use that Motivate Kids

at:

Parents, it's your turn to take the stage:

What are your opinions about this blog post or your suggestions for helping your kids? Please answer in the comment link below.

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With warm wishes,

Jean Tracy, MSS

Sign up for my Newsletter at http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/contact.asp
and receive 80 fun activities to motivate your kids.

****** If you liked this article, please send it to your social media sites below.


Parenting Activity: This Project Brings Out the Potential Artist in Kids

Heart Mold from Mary Romero
Bring out the Potential Artist in Your Child with Love

If you enjoy bringing out the potential artist in your child, Mary Romero’s project will help.Mary is a professional working with Juvenile Delinquent KIds. She has lots of artistic ideas for kids. Use can use this project for a Valentine gift.

 SUPPLIES You Will Need

  • Heart Shaped Construction Paper
  • Wooden shape/mold, etc.
  • Red Acrylic Paint
  • White Acrylic Paint
  • Yellow Acrylic Paint
  • Brown and/or Black Acrylic  Paint
  • Sharpie Black Pen
  • Sealant

DETAILED INSTRUCTIONS

1.)  If you have chosen a heart shaped mold, heart shaped wooden piece, etc., you must first paint the entire piece red and let this dry.  If you have chosen a red piece of construction paper, just cut this into

Approximately a 7” wide x 6 1/2” tall heart shape. 

 2.)  Next, either brush your child’s hands with the white acrylic paint or, have them ‘dip’ their hands in the paint by first spreading some on a paper plate or other disposable surface.

 3.)  Carefully place your child’s hand, one at a time, with palms down, fingers to the outside of the tips of heart with thumbs touching in the middle.  Your child’s handprints will be the wings of your finished piece!  Let this dry.

 

4.)  You can either leave your piece as is or, as shown in photo, paint an angel, boy or girl, in the middle of the handprints.  Finish by using either a Sharpie paint pen or the acrylic paint, writing, “Mommy says my wings came from heaven” with 3 hearts at the end, as shown.  Let dry.

 5.)  Finish by using a sealant spray or use ‘Mod Podge Gloss’ by Plaid, for a nice gloss sealant.

 Wonderful for gift giving ANY time of year!  Personalize with child’s name and date.  If you use a mold, prior to it being dry, you can even put your child’s handprint into the back of the mold!  Be creative, have fun!!

Blog Optimistic Mary Romero   Applause_18229118

Let's give Mary Romero a BIG HAND for her project bringing out the potential artist in kids. If you're an artist you'll expecially love sharing this project with your child.

Please Contact Mary Romero at: Live Life Coaching  

Parents, it's your turn to take the stage:

What are your opinions about this blog post or your suggestions for helping your kids? Please answer in the comment link below.

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With warm wishes,

Jean Tracy, MSS

Sign up for my Newsletter and receive 80 fun activities to play with your kids.

******If you liked this article, please send it to your social media sites below.


Parenting Time: How This Formula Helps You Decide about Kids!

Mother Daughter Hug
Parenting Priorities Formula for Kids!

If you’re a parent and you’re tired of priorities making you “too busy” for your kids, this formula is just what you need. Don’t let the “crunch of time” steal precious moments between you and your children.

I know listening takes time. It’s hard when your mind is flooded with things to do. It isn’t easy to wait for your chatterbox to develop her ideas. When you’re busy, you may wish she’d leave you alone.

 Being distracted now and then won’t hurt. But if not listening becomes a habit, don’t be surprised if your child stops confiding in you. Then imagine the turbulent teenage years. Who will your child be confiding in then?

 What Will You Say?

 If your child wants to talk, or asks you to attend a game, or to go to a school event, what will you say? Consider this 3 Question Formula first:

 The 3 Question Formula:

 1. If I don’t listen to my child, will it be important 10 minutes from now?

2. If I don’t listen to my child, will it be important 10 months from now?

3. If I don’t listen to my child, will it be important 10 years from now?

 Your child thirsts for your attention. To listen attentively is your gift of love.

 You Can Make This Promise to Yourself:

 “I will listen to my child. I will look into her eyes. I will ask questions to clarify and show my interest. I will repeat some of her words to keep her talking because my time is love.” You can make this promise to yourself. I know you can.  

Build your relationship now! Become her confidant forever!

Jean_tracy_white_100x100
by Jean Tracy, MSS


Parents, it's your turn to take the stage:

What are your opinions about this blog post or your suggestions for helping your kids? Please answer in the comment link below.

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Bonus Article: Self-Esteem – 3 Love Notes from Parents

Click here to receive it:

http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/feature_article.asp?fa_id=52

With warm wishes,

Jean Tracy, MSS

Sign up for my Newsletter at http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/ and receive 80 fun activities to play with your kids.

******If you liked this article, please send it to your social media sites below.


Obesity Expert Gives Schools 9 Solutions for Helping Kids


Girl and weight scale
Should Schools Weigh Kids?

If you have an obese child and know her school classmates treat her
badly, you must hear our guest blogger, William Anderson. His solutions are practical, make sense, and don't humiliate kids. This blog post is taken from his article, What Should the Schools Do To Fight the Childhood Obesty Epidemic? Let's find out what he has to say.

The School Nurse and the Scale

My most vivid childhood memories are from grade school. They are awful memories of ugly days, too many to count. I was “the fat kid.”

Every year, the school nurse would make her way from room to room, a doctor’s scale in tow. When she got to our room, we were called by name, and we got weighed. It was like walking to the gallows. I used to think that my misery was unique, but at age 61, as a psychotherapist who has heard thousands of people tell their most intimate secrets, I’ve learned that I am far from alone. Memories of gym evoke similar stories, people learning to hate school, developing bad thoughts and feelings about themselves that have lasted a lifetime.

Did This School Department Plan to Humiliate Kids?

About 5 years ago, the school department where I live announced their plans to fight the childhood obesity epidemic. When I heard that they were going to weigh the kids, grade them, and send notes home about being overweight, it shocked me. How demeaning. How could people who supposedly understood kids think this was a good idea? Are they planning to do this to high school kids too? Appalling.

Advice from a Psychotherapist Who Understands

Today, in my psychotherapy practice, I specialize in weight control. By luck or grace, at age 33, because of my unique “education” and training, I lost 140 pounds and solved my obesity problem. More importantly, I discovered an extremely rare body of knowledge about obesity, its cause, and its solution. With what I now know, it’s become painfully apparent to me that most doctors, therapists, nutritionists, teachers, and trainers don’t know what the problem is or how to solve it.

It’s terrific that Mrs. Obama, the nation and the schools have decided to fight the obesity epidemic — but let’s declare war on the disorder, not the people who have it. As an expert on the subject, I’d offer the following recommendations regarding how schools should (and should not) respond to our growing obesity epidemic:

9 Solutions Schools Need for Helping Obese Students

 First ~ Admit that while you know the science related to biology and nutrition, you do not understand all the mysteries of human behavior, self-control, habit management, or exactly how to solve obesity. Don’t talk to the kids as if you do. This is the domain of a small set of highly specialized clinicians in behavioral medicine. Few people have their expertise. Tell the kids that you can teach them about science and the obesity epidemic, but you can only teach them what you know. They need to take what you can teach them and keep learning.

Second ~ Don’t weigh the kids. Don’t send notes to the parents about their child being overweight. Don’t do anything that would shine the spotlight on them because they are fat. They already know it and feel bad about it. They will be advised about their weight, individually, at their regular medical check-ups, and if check-ups aren’t happening, address that as a separate health issue.

Third ~ Instead, teach them about science and health. Teach them about personal responsibility. The kids need to know who and what to believe and how to separate reliable sources from unreliable. They need to understand that no one else will make them healthy and happy if they don’t take on the job themselves. They need to learn to discount diet gossip and nonsense “news.” They need to learn how to learn, and they need to learn real science.

Fourth ~ Children are often powerless to alter the food at home, but instead of singling out the parents of the overweight kids, send a notice to all parents about the obesity epidemic. Remind parents that the schools’ responsibility is education, and does not overstep or relieve them of their responsibilities as a parent. Then, offer all parents the help you are planning to offer the parents of the overweight kids. Concerned parents will accept the help, and the ones who are not concerned won’t, whether or not you single them out.

Fifth ~ Stop perpetuating the myth that lack of exercise is the cause of the obesity epidemic and that exercise is the solution. Our obesity is due to our over-eating, to our love affair with consumerism as a way of life. A hard workout may burn the equivalent of one coke, so it is common to exercise and then negate the effects when you have an extra coke (or more.) People who start to exercise will often gain weight instead of losing it. Exercise is vitally important to health, an issue as important as obesity, but it is a separate issue.

Sixth ~ Get the “junk food” vending machines and merchants out of the schools. There is no justifiable reason for exploiting the kids by selling them a lifestyle that is killing us. Get the money to run the schools somewhere else.
Vending Machine

Seventh ~ Teach the kids about the forces and rules of the marketplace. Teach them that some advertisers and merchants will mislead them, even into scams and dangers like cigarettes, unhealthy food, and weight loss quackery, when they can make money doing it.

Eighth ~ Have your schools “model” healthy behavior and thinking. Your dieticians and cafeterias can present healthy foods and portions instead of the unhealthy things that we think are normal. School personnel should be required to advocate a healthy lifestyle instead of endorsing the American norm of celebratory gluttony. Faculty and staff would be terminated, I’m sure, if they were to openly advocate sexual debauchery or alcoholic binge drinking. Holiday-superbowl-party-picnic gluttony should be held in the same esteem. It’s no less life threatening.

Ninth ~ Most importantly, develop an ongoing program to draw kids into the pursuit of health and happiness. Our social institutions need to develop a “health culture” to counteract the consumer culture, and the schools are the backbone of our social institutions and culture. If we can rally kids to promote school spirit, to be patriotic, to support the troops or the United Way, we can certainly rally them to be committed to their own highest potential and best health. Rather than focus on obesity and find kids to fault, let’s champion success and health, and pull all the kids into a lifelong campaign to have their best health and best life. In their hearts, they all really want that. We all do. If you hold it out for them to aspire to, they will reach for it.

******

William Anderson      Applause_18229118
William Anderson

Let's give William Anderson a BIG HAND for his knowledge, compassion, and help.

Connect with William Anderson LMHC at http://theandersonmethod.com/author/theander/

  Blog Potential The Anderson Method

Parents, it's your turn to take the stage:

What are your opinions about this blog post or your suggestions for helping your kids? Please answer in the comment link below.

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With warm wishes,

Jean Tracy, MSS

Sign up for my Newsletter at http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/ and receive 80 fun activities to play with your kids.

******If you liked this article, please send it to your social media sites below.


10 Tips: How Sports Can Teach Your Kids Math

IStock_000006017154XFamily soccer

Find Out How Sports Can Teach Kids Math

 If you'd like 10 ways sports can teach math, you have to read this article. It comes to us through a babysitters blog. If kids learned math this way, they might have a lot more fun with numbers. The original article is entitled, 10 Ways to Use Sports to Teach Math. Let's see how this works.

"All kids are different and some may excel in math naturally while others may get confused by all of the concepts.  Sometimes switching the way a child looks at math is all it takes to get the concept to “click” for them.  For the child who is interested in sports, it may be more fun for them to use sports in order to learn math concepts.  Check out 10 ways to use sports to teach math.

First ~ How Bowling Teaches Addition:

When you roll the ball and knock over pins you write down how many pins you knocked down.  Then you roll your second ball down the lane and knock over more pins, you add those to what you knocked over with your first ball.  Then a total is created in the big part of the frame on the score sheet.  When the next frame is bowled the student will not only get to add up how many pins they knocked over in that frame, but then they get to add them to what they knocked over in previous frames.

Second ~ How Baseball Teaches Batting Averages:

The number of times a player hits the ball and gets on base versus the number of times at bat will give their batting average.  That could be a way to teach percentages to a child.  For example, if a batter is up to bat 10 times, but only gets on base 5 times then their batting average would be .500.  This could be converted to 50%.

Third ~ How Pool Teach Trigonometry:

A child can use trigonometry when they play pool.  Figuring out what angle needs to be created in order to sink the ball into the pocket can be mathematically figured out.  Using an Isosceles triangle of 3 by 4 by 5 will determine where the cue needs to be to make the shot.

Fourth ~ How Football Teaches Subtraction:

If a player kicked a ball from their 20 yard line and it made it to the 50 yard line how far was the kick?  50-20=30 so the kick was 30 yards.  If team X needs to make it to their 40 yard line to make a first down and they are now at their own 12 yard line because of penalties and such how many yards does a player have to run to make the first down?  40-12=28 yards.

Fifth ~ How Soccer Teaches statistics:

Based on how a player does during the season is a good predictor on how they will do in the future.  If a player has made a goal in 5 out of their last 8 games the odds of them making a goal in future games is very good.  The exact chance can be determined using a formula.

Sixth ~ How Basketball Teaches Mean, Median, Mode and Range: 

Open the sports section of any paper and pull up the details from a basketball game from the night before.  Ask the child to write down how many points each player scored on Team X.  The players scored 2, 4, 6, 6, 8, 10 and 12.  After explaining what the above terms mean the student can determine that the mean score is 6.9.  The median is 6.  The range is 10 and the mode is 6.

Seventh ~ How Car Racing Teaches Velocity:

Sprint cars go so many feet in a certain amount of time and a formula can be used to determine the velocity that the car was going. 

Eighth ~ How Skateboarding Teaches Algebra:

If a child is building a half-pipe ramp they will need to determine how long the ramp needs to be and at what angle they need to make it in order to achieve the distance that they want.  They will use algebra to find these measurements.

Ninth ~ How Basketball Teaches Range Function:

Graphing the angle at which a basketball is shot from and the distance from where it is shot you can determine how fast the ball has to be thrown in order to make the basket.

Tenth ~ How Golf Teaches Probability:

There are many sites that contain tons of data regarding sports figures.  So if you don’t like golf you can use many other types of sports for this exercise, but if you look up all of the times that a golfer has made a hole in one and then look at how many holes of golf they have played using probability you can determine how high the chance is that a golfer will get a hole in one.  The chances are pretty small."

******

Let’s give a BIG HAND to the admin at:

Applause_18229118
What a fun way to learn math! Go here to get more fine articles from:

http://www.babysitters.net/blog/10-ways-to-use-sports-to-teach-math/

******

Parents, it's your turn to take the stage:

What are your opinions about this blog post or your suggestions for helping your kids? Please answer in the comment link below.

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With warm wishes,

Jean Tracy, MSS

Sign up for my Newsletter at http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/ and receive 80 fun activities to play with your kids.

******If you liked this article, please send it to your social media sites below.


Power of Positive Thinking: How to Build Character Potential with Showtime

 IStock_000002019476XSmall.jpgBoyFishing
Positive Thinking Builds Character in Kids

If you'd like your child to use positive thinking and build character too, our returning guest expert, Kendra Delano, takes an excerpt from her book, 'Showtime,' to show us how. First she'll use an example from herself and then from Caden, her son.

'Showtime' Example When Things Go Wrong:

"Did you know that anger is the second feeling? You usually feel sadness, fear, embarrassment, or loneliness first.

I had to remind myself of that when a workman didn’t show up to fix my air conditioner on three separate occasions. Every time I saw him he told me, “Manana…” So I would wait around all the next day hoping for some relief from heat to no avail.

I was livid but my first feeling was sadness. I felt insignificant and abandoned in a strange new place. I certainly felt better when someone explained that "manana" doesn’t only mean "tomorrow."

When used by a worker it is a face-saving way of saying that he or she doesn’t have the skill or contacts to do the job properly. "Manana" can mean, “Not today!”

How the Power of Positive Thinking Builds Character and Potential in Kids:

Caden's Story ~

"After my five-year-old son calms down from feeling angry we go back over the scenario and identify the first feeling he had. I empathize with him.

Then I ask how he could have handled that painful feeling differently (instead of raging, for example). Sometimes just labeling and acknowledging the first feeling brings unexpected gratitude from him because I shed light on why he behaved the way that he did.

A second point is that it’s important to monitor thoughts. By thinking, “I am going to have a good day anyway!” even after a disappointment, a person is primed to attract positive instead of more negative events.

Teach your children not to dwell on what happened but to focus (actually visualize) what they would LIKE to happen. They need to label what they want and expect it!

Lastly, it is in our nature to feel happy. Just look at your children each day and you will be reminded to feel awe and wonder and amusement instead of anxiety or fear!

Caden just came into the house as proud as he could possibly be. He asked if I would like to take the small fish he held in his hands and cook it up for dinner."

"Ummm, let’s take it to a restaurant. Surely someone other than I can take it back into the kitchen and make some terrific fajitas out of it!"

"I’ll teach him to catch and release tomorrow."

******

Connect with Kendra and get her book, 'Showtime' at: www.SameDayDifferentChoices.com

Blog Potential ~ Showtime Book
'Showtime'
Let's give Kendra a BIG HAND for sharing how she uses and teaches the power of positive thinking. The example from her book 'Showtime' makes her method clear.

Blog Optimistic Kendra Delano Applause_18229118

Kendra Delano

******

Bonus Article:

Social Conscience: How to Use Moral Dilemmas Effectively with Kids

at:  http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/feature_article.asp?fa_id=109 

Parents, it's your turn to take the stage:

What are your opinions about this blog post or your suggestions for helping your kids? Please answer in the comment link below.

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With warm wishes,

Jean Tracy, MSS

Sign up for my Newsletter at http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/ and receive 80 fun activities to play with your kids.

******If you liked this article, please send it to your social media sites below.


10 Top Character Tips for Developing Potential in Kids

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Building Character, Potential, and Flexable Thinking in Kids

If you'd like to build character in your kids and develop their potential too, keep reading. Our parenting expert, Kendra Delano, has taught children to think flexibly and positively, communicate effectively, overcome adversity, and make great choices throughout her 17 year career as an international educator. Let's listen to her advice.

Top 10 Tips for Developing Character, Potential, and Flexible Thinking:

First ~Teach Your Children to Observe:

Whenever someone enters a new setting, he or she should learn to watch how the people are behaving before making any attempt to interact. Are they having quiet or boisterous conversations? Are there children running around or are most people sitting down? This is the most important element in learning to adapt to a new environment.

Second ~ Venture Out ~ Travel:

You don’t have to leave the country. If you live in the suburbs go into a rural area or the city. Most urban areas have ethnic sections such as China Town, Greek Town, etc. Realize that the first people to approach you are usually in some form of sales and marketing. Quietly walk on. After that soak in every flavor, sound and interaction!

Third ~  Encourage Reading: Children learn vicariously from strong characters. Authors usually plant valuable insights and lessons into their stories. Voracious readers tend to be wise people.

Fourth: Show Children that You Withhold Judgment:

Avoid labeling any person or situation as good or bad. I have an example. A friend’s teenage daughter was telling about a girl with a poor reputation. I asked WHY she thought that girl went with so many different boys. After a pause she replied, “Because her dad left home a long time ago. She doesn’t see him so maybe she needs more attention from boys.” Bingo. Encourage children to understand and think below the surface.

Fifth ~ Never Confuse a Child’s Behavior with Their Worth:

I NEVER use the expression, “You are a bad boy or girl.” It hurts me just to write it. Everyone is valuable and intrinsically good. There are only good people who CHOOSE to behave badly. Behaviors can be modified.

Sixth ~ Encourage Children to Label Their Feelings (develop self-awareness):

Stick to the basic ones: mad, sad, glad, hurt, ashamed, afraid, and lonely.

Seventh ~  Keep a Journal:

In addition to making diary entries have children label the choices they make each day and the outcomes of those choices. Encourage children to find a correlation between the words and behaviors chosen and how their days are unfolding.

Eighth ~ Encourage Children to Consider New Possibilities:

As a teacher I used to read the story of Chicken Little to my first graders. After the story I asked, “How is Chicken Little the same as a child who shouts, “He stole my pencil!?” I asked the children to brainstorm how a pencil could have found its way into a classmate’s desk. They answered that it could have fallen on the floor and been picked up, that it could have rolled over to the desk, that the same brand of pencil could have been purchased by two different students, etc.

Ninth ~ Encourage Children to Problem Solve:

So many well-intentioned parents jump in to solve their children’s problems. Wait. See how resourceful and ingenious your child can be. Remember the person who tried to help a butterfly break out of its cocoon. The butterfly died because it needed to do the work itself!

Tenth ~ Show Your Children That You Sometimes Change Your Mind:

Show them that after considering new information you have changed your position. Wise people take their time in making a decision and are never afraid to admit they were wrong.

******

Connect with Kendra and get her book, 'Showtime' at:  www.SameDayDifferentChoices.com

Blog Potential ~ Showtime Book
  'Showtime'

Let's give Kendra a GRATEFUL HAND for her outstanding tips. She has the knowledge and the ability to communicate well.

 Blog Optimistic Kendra Delano      Applause_18229118

Kendra Delano

******

Bonus Article:

How Discussions, Quotes, and Compliments Build Character in Kids

at:  http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/feature_article.asp?fa_id=119

******

Parents, it's your turn to take the stage:

What are your opinions about this blog post or your suggestions for helping your kids? Please answer in the comment link below.

Bigstock_Question_mark_18383141 (596x800) (477x640) (149x200) (75x100)

With warm wishes,

Jean Tracy, MSS

Sign up for my Newsletter at http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/ and receive 80 fun activities to play with your kids.

******If you liked this article, please send it to your social media sites below.