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Child Development Activity ~ Crafting with Stickers!

IStock_000005574425X2 kids art
     Crafts Increase Child Development

 


If you'd like to promote your child's development with crafts, listen to our guest blogger, Jessica Wiener. She creates stickers and labels in her business and has suggestions on helping your child create their own.

You'll handle the tools. Your kids will pick out the page of stickers from the computer and cut them into individual pieces. 

The following activity is from Jessica's:

 

"Gadget-Free Activities for Hungry Minds

The excitement, curiosity, and unfettered energy of children demonstrate the need for healthy development early in life. Especially with today’s ease of access to counterproductive media channels and games, establishing a set of healthy activities for kids to do at home is paramount.

The following activities, from Custom Stickers projects to capture the flag, engage the cognitive and motor skills that children need to hone while they are young. As a University of Michigan Health System finding affirms, these activities will also ensure that other developmental milestones like linguistic and social skills are achieved. 

Custom Stickers

This project is fairly inexpensive and clean, provided the following tools and materials are used: 

1. Printable cardstock. Generally, thicker is better.

2. Scissors. If you intend to make a lot of stickers, a more industrial 
paper cutter is very useful. 

3. Razor or X-Acto knife. The part of the project that calls for this 
tool should be handled by an adult. 

4. Carpet tape. This strong, double-sided tape is ideal for bonding 
stickers. 

Have each child design a page of stickers from the computer and print them onto the cardstock. Then, apply the carpet tape to the back side. Use the razor to cut the paper and tape into rows. Finally, let the kids cut their stickers into different shapes with the scissors. Formatting tips and other projects can be further explored at How2stickers.com. 


By incorporating different kinds of games like those mentioned above, you give your kids something to do while they improve their cognition, creativity, and overall health.

As detailed in a publication by the Society for Research in Child Development, the earlier kids are engaged in safe activities, the better. After setting a solid foundation in this way, you can regain some of your independence while your children strive to earn their own."

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Bio:  Jessica Wiener is a specialist in the manufacturing of Custom Stickers. When she is not writing for LightningLabels.com,  you can find her cooking up a storm in her kitchen.

Let's give a BIG HAND to Jessica Wiener for sharing this fun activitiy.

Jessica Wiener        Applause_18229118

 Jessica Wiener

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What are your opinions about this blog post or your suggestions for creating crafts with your kids? Please answer in the comment link below.

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With warm wishes,

Jean Tracy, MSS

Sign up for my Free Parenting Newsletter and receive:

  • 80 Fun Activities to Share with Your Kids
  • 101 Ways to Get Your Children to Cooperate
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****** If you liked this article, please write a comment and send it to your social media sites below.


Mind Power Strategy Helps Kids Overcome Boredom!

African_Girl_Thinking

   Mind Power Overcomes Boredom!

If you want a mind power strategy for helping your kids overcome boredom, stay tuned. Our parenting expert, Ellen Galinsky, shares lots of activities for developing young minds in her book, Mind in the Making. Today I'll share an excerpt from her book that could help your child stop saying, "I'm bored."

 Ellen developed this idea from her children's school. Children would plan their mornings during circle time. They were asked which learning activities they would like to choose. They'd go and do those activities and then come back to circle time and discuss what they learned.

 

Mind Power Strategy Helps Kids Overcome Boredom! 

"...There's nothing worse than a child treating parents as if we're "Entertainment Central," whining, "There's nothing to do! I'm bored!" So when Philip, (Ellen's son) six years old, told me one Saturday morning that he was bored, I sat down with him and we made a list of all of the things he liked to do and posted it on his bulletin board.

Any time he complained that he was bored, we went to the list and he would choose an activity. As at his school, I'd ask him to make plans about how he was going to carry out this activity and then report on how it went.

Exercising Working Memory In Your Child

Little did I know at the time that he was exercising his "working memory." I did know that this strategy was a great way to deal with "good old-fashioned boredom," which doesn't feel so good when it comes in the form of a child whining, "There's nothing to do!" from pages 56-57.

In the above example, working memory included making plans, doing them, and discussing the results.

Parenting Action Plan:

Make a list with your child of the things he likes to do. Post it. Then do what Ellen did. See if he ever says, "I'm bored," again.

Let's give a BIG HAND to Ellen Galinsky for her brilliant work in expanding our children's mind power, working memory, and in overcoming boredom.

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Ellen Galinsky                Applause_18229118 

Ellen Galinsky

Ellen Galinsky holds a Master of Science degree in Child Development/Education from Bank Street College of Education, a Bachelor of Arts degree in Child Study from Vassar College and numerous honorary doctoral degrees.

Pick up her book, Mind in the Making: The Seven Essential Life Skills Every Child Needs  It's full of activities that build Mind Power in children.

Mind in the making best

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What are your opinions about this blog post or your suggestions for helping your children overcome boredom? Please answer in the comment link below.

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With warm wishes,

Jean Tracy, MSS

Sign up for my Free Parenting Newsletter and receive:

  • 80 Fun Activities to Share with Your Kids
  • 101 Ways to Get Your Children to Cooperate
  • 

****** If you liked this article, please write a comment and send it to your social media sites below.

 


Character Tips for Parents: 7 Positive Ways to Get Kids to Cooperate!

Parents, today you'll receive the best character tips for getting cooperation from your kids. Kathy Slattengren, our parenting expert, will share 7 commands to avoid and 7 ways to get cooperation. This is an excerpt from her amazon book, Priceless Parenting Guidebook: Ideas for Handling Everyday Parenting Challenges

Character Tips for Parents

"Setting a Positive Tone ~

Parents play a lead role in setting the overall tone in their families. Parents whose overall tone tends to be negative often have homes filled with  stress and tension. On the other hand parents who use a more positive approach create calmer, happier homes.

Sometimes parents get in the habil of interacting with their children using negative statements and commands. Read the following statements one dad made to his children and think about how you would feel if you were a child hearing these remarks.

How Not to Build Character and  How to Lose Cooperation

1. "You aren't going outside until you put your sunscreen on."

2. "Stop messing around with that!"

3. "If you don't hurry up and put your shoes on, I'm not taking you."

4. "You've already watched too much TV. You should not have turned it on again. Now turn it off."

5. "You're not eating dinner until you wash your hands."

6. "You are dawdling and we're going to be late."

7. "Stop bugging your sister!"

How do you feel reading these statements? Let's look at how these same ideas could be expressed more positively.

7 Positive Character Tips for Getting Kids' Cooperation

1. "Feel free to go outside as soon as you put sunscreen on."

2. "That could break so play with this instead."

3. "I'm leaving in 2 minutes. I'd be happy to take you if you have your shoes on."

4. "Your time for TV is up for today. Would you like to turn the TV off, or would you like me to turn it off?"

5. "Please wash your hands, then join us for dinner."

6. "Were leaving in 5 minutes. Do you plan to be dressed or are you taking your clothes in a bag?"

7. "Your sister wants to be left alone right now. Do you want to play a game with me or go outside?"

How do you feel now? The words we use make a huge difference. When we use more positive statements the words we use demonstrate an unspoken belief that our children are capable and are likely to choose appropriate behavior."

"The words we choose create the tone they hear!" pages 11-12.

Kathy is an expert in setting the right tone for getting kids cooperation. I like how she asks us to see how we would feel if we were commanded with a negative tone.

Lets give Kathy a BIG HAND for setting a positive tone.

Social Skills for Kids Kathy SlattengrenApplause_18229118
Kathy Slattengren 

If you're looking for solid parenting advice, pick up Kathy's book: Priceless Parenting Guidebook: Ideas for Handling Everyday Parenting Challenges  

Cover Priceless Parenting
         Available on Amazon now!

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What are your opinions about this blog post or your suggestions for creating a positive tone with your children? Please answer in the comment link below.

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With warm wishes,

Jean Tracy, MSS

Sign up for my Free Parenting Newsletter and receive:

  • 80 Fun Activities to Share with Your Kids
  • 101 Ways to Get Your Children to Cooperate

****** If you liked this article, please write a comment and send it to your social media sites below.


The Relaxation Solution ~ When Cranky Kids Need Rest!

Bog Siblings Fighting
     Do Your Kids Need Rest?

Yes, your children need rest! That's what research tells us. So what's the solution when your kids yell, "NO! I'm not tired?"

You turn to Lori Lite from Stress Free Kids. Lori has created beautiful books, melodic CD's, and special stories for helping kids with all sorts of problems learn to relax.

The other day I was babysitting my 4-year-old granddaughter. She hates naps and frequently asks, "Do I have to take a nap today?" Each time I say, "Yes." That's it. Nothing more. Just "Yes."

Last Thursday after lunch, I picked up Lori Lite's book, The Goodnight Caterpillar. Allyssa jumped on the sofa beside me. She insisted on seeing each colorful picture.

Goodnight-Caterpillar-150x150

If you've ever thought you get stressed and tied up in knots you should see Lori's caterpillar. But with systematic relaxation and the voice of a little red haired girl looking a bit like Raggity Ann, he settled down to rest. So did my granddaughter.

After the story she went to her room, climbed into bed, and took a 2 hour nap.

I suggest you look into Lori Lite's relaxation system. When children learn how to relax at an early age they learn a gift for life. Lori gives you just what you need to teach your kids. Her methods will help you relax too.

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Let's give Lori Lite a BIG HAND for her excellent methods that help kids relax.

  Lori Lite headshot Applause_18229118
        Lori Lite

You can connect with Lori at StressFreeKids or go to her Store at Amazon. Look over her materials and choose the ones you need.

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 What are your opinions about this blog post or your suggestions for helping your kids relax? Please answer in the comment link below.

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With warm wishes,

Jean Tracy, MSS

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  • 80 Fun Activities to Share with Your Kids
  • 101 Ways to Get Your Children to Cooperate

****** If you liked this article, please write a comment and send it to your social media sites below.


The Thank You Formula ~ 3 Practical Ways to Teach Kids!

 Beautiful Black Girl

      The Thank You Formula Works!

Have you ever felt embarrassed because your child didn’t say, “Thank-you?” Would you

like to try a simple formula for helping your kids say the magic words? If yes, often role

play the following:

The Thank-You Formula ~ Post It on Refrigerator

“Thank-you” + Name of Giver + I like this because...

The Role-Playing Activity:

Imagine objects in the room are gifts. Hand an object to your child and pretend

you are someone who gave him the object as a gift. Then ask your child to use the

formula with each object you give him.

3 Practical Ways to Teach Your Child:

1. Hand your child a pillow. Pretend you are Aunt Helen. Your child could say,

“Thank-you, Aunt Helen. I like this pillow because it will look great on my bed.”

2. Hand your child a pencil. Pretend you are Grandma. Your child could say,

“Thank-you, Grandma. I like this pencil because it’s easy to write with.”

3. Hand your child a book. Pretend you are a friend’s mom. Your child could say,

“Thank-you, Mrs. White. I like this Harry Potter book because the stories are scary.”

Teach Honesty When Saying Thank You:

Maybe your child doesn’t want the gift. Explain that the gift giver wanted to please him

and it’s not nice to say something unkind or hurt the giver’s feelings.

Tell him to practice the Thank-you Formula by finding something he likes about it, like

its size, color, or shape.

If you explain the formula, use it in role-plays, and help your child find something

likable about the gift, your child will know exactly what to say in the future. You

won’t be embarrassed either.

by Jean Tracy, MSS

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Jean_tracy_white_100x100

I've used this formula with my grandchildren. It was so easy. Let me know how you like it.

 

 

What are your opinions about this blog post or your suggestions for teaching your children to say 'Thank You?'? Please answer in the comment link below.

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With warm wishes,

Jean Tracy, MSS

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Character Problems: 10 Signs Your Kids Are Poor Sports

IStockboypouting
 Help Your Poor Sport Become a  Good Sport!

If your child is a poor loser, this could be a signal that he's developing a character problem you'll need to turn around.  You'll know for sure when you read what Abby Nelson, our expert blogger, says in the post, 10 Ways to Tell Your Child Is a Poor Loser. Let's find out what she lists.

10 Signs Your Child Is a Poor Sport

Part of growing up is learning how to deal with adversity. It happens and, like it or not, we can’t always give out trophies to each of life’s participants. How a child handles losing is related to how they view competition, themselves and their peers. When too much emphasis is placed on winning, and self-esteem is too closely linked to whether they win or lose, a child can have difficulty accepting defeat.

The following are ten ways to tell if your child is a poor loser:

1. Sulking: She will sulk or storm off if things don’t go her way. Losing is not something that she handles in stride. She may stay upset or sulky the rest of the day, or even longer. Giving into this behavior is the first step to a spoiled child.
 

2. No winners: As a form of the old taking-my-marbles-and going-home pattern, he will leave when losing, taking the ball (or other key game object) with him. The message here is “If I can’t win, then no one else can either”.

3. Fits: Your child cries or throws tantrums when faced with losing. Up to a certain age, it’s understandable for a toddler to express disappointment in such ways; but if it goes on too long, Houston, we’ve got a problem.

4. Avoid: The child has a general tendency to avoid admitting mistakes. It may be that she’s gotten the message that being wrong, or failing, means being a failure. It is important for children to learn how to learn from their mistakes, not deny that they make any.

5. Cheat: A child for whom losing is not a viable option may be willing to cheat in order to avoid it. Going out of turn, changing the rules mid-game, etc. If the child continues to play unfairly, they will soon be playing alone.

6. Excuses: Excuse making is another trait common among children who can’t accept failure. Claims of unfairness or favoritism are often part of the mix. Children should be taught not to blame others for failure.

7. Gloating: Gloating or ridiculing others when she wins is often the flip side of poor losing skills. Winning with aplomb is as important as losing gracefully. Remind the child to treat others as they would want to be treated.

8. Shame: Another manifestation of poor losing is shame. When a child believes that their worth as a person is determined by whether they win or lose, then losing means having less worth. Assure your children that losing doesn’t change how you, or others, feel about them.

9. Anger: Aggressive behavior, even outright violence, is exhibited by children who can’t deal with losing. A win-at-all-costs mentality drives the child to extreme behavior. Make sure the child knows that this is unacceptable and teach them more constructive ways of dealing with failure.

10. Change: A child might repetitively switch activities, ostensibly in search of some recreational pursuit in which they can claim victory every time; or conversely, they may shy from all competitive pursuits, to avoid the trauma of losing altogether.

No matter what tactic the child chooses, they need to be taught how to deal with failure just as much as they are taught how to deal with success. No one is perfect, and we all fail at times. Learning from your mistakes is one of the cornerstones of maturity. Help children realize that failure is just another learning experience.

Let's THANK Abby Nelson for bringing this information to us. If kids grow up being poor losers, they may develop a character problem that's difficult to turn around. That's why parents must work with children to make positive changes.

Connect with Abby Nelson 

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Parents, it's your turn to take the microphone:

What are your opinions about this blog post or your suggestions for helping parents deal with kids who are poor losers? Please answer in the comment link below.

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With warm wishes,

Jean Tracy, MSS

Sign up for my FREE Parenting Newsletter and receive 80 Fun Activities to Share with Your Kids and 101 Ways to Get Your Children to Cooperate.

****** If you liked this article, please send it to your social media sites below.


10 Tips When Your Kids Are Bullied and Suffering!

If your child is being teased your both may be suffering. Our guest blogger, Paul Taylor, sent this information in the article, 10 Tips for a Child Being Relentlessly Teased. Let's find out what he suggests.

10 Tips to Help Children Deal with Bullies

Being teased and picked on by bullies can be one of the toughest parts of growing up. It’s important to remember that even if someone never physically hurts you, harassment and tormenting you with words is still a serious form of bullying. If you’re being teased or bullied at school, here are some tips to help you deal with the situation to the very best of your abilities.

1. Tell an Adult – Many kids don’t want to tell an adult what they’re going through for fear of making things worse, but it’s very important to let a parent, teacher or family friend know what’s happening to protect yourself and the other kids that the bullies are picking on.

2. Walk Away – Sometimes, just letting a bully know that you’re not afraid of them is enough to discourage them from picking on you. Keep your head high, walk away and ignore the hurtful things they say the best you can.

3. Be a Friend – If you see another kid getting picked on, stick up for them. You might make a new friend who can return the favor sometime, and who also understands what you’re going through.

4. Never Retaliate – No matter how mean the things a bully says to you are, you should never try to fight them. On top of getting you in trouble or causing someone to be hurt, you’ll be giving the bully exactly what they’re looking for: a reaction.

5. Don’t Open Messages – Don’t even open emails, texts or Facebook messages from people that you know are bullies. The things inside are bound to be hurtful, and probably untrue. No good will come of reading them, and the people who send those messages won’t be able to get any satisfaction from saying something hurtful if you don’t bother to read it.

6. Skipping Class is a Bad Idea – It can be very tempting to skip class or pretend to be sick to get out of school to avoid being teased, but it’s not the right solution to the problem. Missing too much school can cause trouble for you and your parents, in addition to making it almost impossible to maintain your grades.

7. Report and Block – Most social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter have “Report” buttons, allowing people to anonymously report messages and posts with harassing content. Reporting these messages and blocking the sender are two of the best ways to prevent online bullying.

8. It’s Not Your Fault – No matter what you’re being teased about, the behavior of the bullies that are picking on you is not acceptable, and it’s not your fault. Don’t blame or be angry with yourself; understand that the bully is the one with the real problem.

9. Don’t Be a Bully – It’s easy to take your frustrations about being teased out on other kids by bullying them in turn, but you should never resort to this behavior. It won’t make you feel better about your own situation; it’ll only cause you to feel guilty and make someone else feel as badly as you do when you’re on the receiving end.

10. Be Proud of Who You Are – Bullies tease people for lots of reasons, but most of them have to do with the way they feel about themselves. Never let a bully’s words make you do or say things you don’t want to, or change who you are. Individuality might cause some people to tease you now, but it will be highly prized in a few years.

Let's THANK Paul Taylor for bringing us this article. May it help you and your kids who are being teased by bullies.

Connect with Paul Taylor

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Parents, it's your turn to take the microphone:

What are your opinions about this blog post or your suggestions for  helping parents and their kids? Please answer in the comment link below.

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With warm wishes,

Jean Tracy, MSS

Sign up for my FREE Parenting Newsletter and receive 80 Fun Activities to Share with Your Kids and 101 Ways to Get Your Children to Cooperate.

****** If you liked this article, please send it to your social media sites below.


How Thoughts Help Parents with Out-of-Control Teens

Alcohol teenager
Parents Worry about Out-of-Control Teens
 

If you're a parent with out-of-control teenagers find out how changing your thoughts can help you cope with the pain.

Rainbow Books Publisher asked me to blog this book, The Whipped Parent: Hope for Parents Raising an Out-of-Control Teen. The authors Kimberly Abraham, Marney Studaker-Cordner, and Kathryn O'Dea have done a stunning job giving help to parents of acting-out teenagers. Find out what they say about the importance of  THOUGHTS in the minds of parents.

The following concerns the mother of a teen called, Top Dog. Top Dog's mom felt guilty, angry, and worried because he drank alcohol, did drugs, and got into fights. TOES is the method her therapist used to help her.

How Parents Change  Thoughts

"To change your actions, you need to change your feelings. You cannot change your feelings until you change your thoughts. Thoughts can be changed.

Here's and example of how Top Dog's mom changed a few of her negative, hair-raising thoughts. Working backward from her actions (lightning), she was able to uncover her feelings and thoughts:

Action - She was begging, bribing and crying. (Why? What was she feeling?)

Feelings - She was scared, hurt and disappointed. (Why? What thoughts made her feel this way?)

Thoughts -  She was thinking her son might get killed. That he didn't care about her. That he might end up in prison. That he could be seriously injured. 

Once Top Dog's mother identified the thoughts that were leaving her feeling whipped, she started working to change her negative thoughts to ones that would help her feel more comfortable:

New Thoughts - To Dog knows what he's doing out there in the world. I have faith that he will do what makes him happy. I'll remind my self that it's his life, not mine.

New Feelings - Confident that Top Dog will take care of himself. Less scared and worried.

New Actions - She is calmer.

Staying on Your TOES

Another positive thought Top Dog's mom uses is, I stay on my TOES:

"I Tell him my hopes."

"Opportunities are provided for him to seek help." (See a therapist or get substance abuse treatment.)

"I Educate him on the dangers and legalities of his actions."

"I Show him by modeling. I don't drink, use drugs or fight."

This helps ease her guilt. She knows she's done all she can. She feels better and she sleeps better.

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I appreciate the TOES method. Saying "I Stay on my TOES," and knowing what it means can be quite helpful for parents who feel out-of-control with anger, guilt, and worry. I also believe strongly that we must deal with our feelings, actions, and thoughts to calm our emotions, think straight, and do the best we can.

The above excerpt is such a small window into a the giant help the authors give in this important book.

Let's give a GRATEFUL THANKS to the authors:

Kimberly Abraham, MSW, CSW, Marney Studaker-Cordner, MSW, CSW,  with Kathryn O'Dea

Pick up their book ~ The Whipped Parent: Hope for Parents Raising an Out-of-Control Teen

The Whipped ParentApplause_18229118                                                      Learn how to preserve your sanity and help your teen.

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What are your opinions about this blog post or your suggestions for helping parents cope? Please answer in the comment link below.

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With warm wishes,

Jean Tracy, MSS

Sign up for my Free Parenting Newsletter and receive:

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****** If you liked this article, please write a comment and send it to your social media sites below.


The 7 Signs of Great Childcare for Kids

Blog Potential ipod baby
Children Need Great Childcare!

What are the 7 signs of great childcare for kids? Our expert author, Brenda Nixon, knows. If you're looking for the best in childcare, read her article, Finding the Right Childcare.


"Did you know. . . Research proves that parents have an important influence on their child’s development regardless of how much out-of-home care children receive?
So whether you work outside the home or you are with your child all day, you are still your child’s most influential teacher. Wow, that's heavy responsibility, right?


However, most parents today need childcare due to our lousy economy. So if you're in that boat, here are a few things to look for in your search:  

1. Adult turnover is low. A stream of new caregivers is unpleasant to young children. It may signal to you that a relationship problem exists between staff and the director, a problem that trickles down to your child. 

2. Children are touched frequently in positive and affirming ways. Children need to be touched, even if it’s a pat on the back, or holding hands during games.

3. Each is addressed by name. There should be a minimal use of group terms like “the infants,” “babies” or “kids.”

4. Caregivers are trained in early childhood education. If not degreed, they should be participating in continuing education every year.

5. Look for a low adult/child ratio.

6. Child-rearing and discipline philosophies are similar to yours. You want leave your child in an environment consistent with yours at home.

7. Sign in and out policies are enforced. Especially if you leave your little one in a large center with lots of foot traffic, security precautions are a must.

Be wary of the caregiver with the Honey, I’ve been tendin’ kids for 20 years an I know all there is to raisin’ babies! attitude. A caregiver worth her salt – and your money – must learn about your child and continually sharpen her caregiving skills.

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Cover Birth to Five Book

You can find a chapter with tons of tips about finding quality childcare in The Birth to Five Book and you can get an autographed copy by mailing $14 per book to me at: P.O. Box 1302 | Mount Vernon, OH 43050. (offer good in the U.S. only)



Brenda Nixon MA
Applause_18229118
  Brenda Nixon

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Let's give Brenda Nixon a BIG HAND for her expertise in finding the best childcare.

Parents, it's your turn to take the microphone:

What are your opinions about this blog post or  what are your best tips for finding quality childcare? Feel free to leave your comment link below.

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With warm wishes,

Jean Tracy, MSS

Sign up for my FREE Parenting Newsletter and receive 80 Fun Activities to Share with Your Kids and 101 Ways to Get Your Children to Cooperate.

****** If you liked this article, please send it to your social media sites below.


Family Mottos: 10 Sure-Fire Sayings to Build Character in Kids

African-american-family-of-four-smiling 

Family Mottos Build Character and Your Parent-Child Bond!


Parents, if you’d like to create a family motto, sit down with your kids and brainstorm. Find out how these guidelines, examples, and action steps make creating mottoes easy. You parent-child bond will blossom and your kids will grow in character.


3 Guidelines for Family Mottoes:


  • Mottos describe your key family values.
  • They are easy to remember.
  • They are short.

10 Sure-Fire Character Building Mottos to Get Your Family Started:


1. We try, try again.

2. We never give up.

3. We believe triumph is “umph” added to try.

4. We believe the language of solutions starts with I.

5. We work best when we work together.

6. We aim higher than the mark.

7. We become all that we can be.

8. We believe everyone matters.

9. We think we can, we know we can.

10. We believe our word is our bond.


7 Action Steps for Creating Family Mottos:


1. Discuss the motto's meaning

2. Repeat it often.

3. Frame it and hang it in a prominent place in your home.

4. Post it on your refrigerator.

5. Write it in family birthday cards

6. Add it in school lunches

7. Share when and how each member is using it.


Guide your family with motivating mottos and build your family character!

Your Parenting Action Step:

Copy this blog and use it in your family meetings.

by Jean Tracy, MSS

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What are your opinions about this blog post or your suggestions for creating family mottos? Please answer in the comment link below.

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With warm wishes,

Jean Tracy, MSS

Sign up for my Free Parenting Newsletter and receive:

  • 80 Fun Activities to Share with Your Kids
  • 101 Ways to Get Your Children to Cooperate

****** If you liked this article, please write a comment and send it to your social media sites below.