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5 Positive Discipline Tips to Give Your Child Wings

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Positive Discipline Helps Kids Fly

If you’re looking for discipline advice with a spiritual outlook, you’re in the right place. Our parenting skills expert, Gigi Schweikert, is here to share 5 solid principles suited to any parent’s beliefs. She is the author of There’s a Perfect Little Angel in Every Child.

First, Gigi will share what ‘little angels’ really look like, how to view their misbehavior, and reveal 5 solid discipline practices.

Does Your Perfect Child Look Like This?

Gigi says “Yes” even when their haloes appear a bit crooked.

1. Kids leave the cupboards wide open.

2. They splash in puddles with their green frog-eyed boots.

3. They forget to do their homework.

4. They cover their faces with mommy’s make-up.

5. Their hands are filthy from digging earthworms.

6. They leave cookie crumbs on the kitchen counter.

7. Their coloring marathons leave marks everywhere.

How to Find the Angel in Your Child

Because children are always learning by exploring, experimenting, and testing your limits, Gigi tells us to:

1. Remember your children’s beauty when they’re asleep.

2. See them through the eyes of wonder.

3. Appreciate their limitless energy.

4. Admire their creativity.

5. Smile at their constant testing behavior.

As parents we have the privilege to guide these wonderful children to be the best they can be. That means turning off our super critical eye to their manners, behavior, or odd wardrobe colors and turn on our positive discipline skills.

Why Parents Must Discipline:

  • To help children develop good behaviors
  • To guide them  in understanding the differences between right and wrong
  • To encourage them to make positive choices

If children learn these things when they're young, they’ll more likely choose well  when they’re adults.

Gigi says, “Discipline is not negative; it’s not mean; it’s not punishment. Rather, discipline is everything we do, say, and teach our children in order to grow them up to be wise, caring, and socially responsible adults. Discipline is, quite simply, raising our children.” (From page 9)

5 Solid Discipline Practices

1. Time Out – one minute for each of your child’s years.

2. Use a loud voice like ‘STOP!’ to prevent danger.

3. Pull over and stop the car when they’re fighting.

4. Get your child’s attention by looking at them at eye-level.

5. Stop what you’re doing when they misbehave. Go to them with a serious look and stance.

These are just a few of the multitude of ideas Gigi shares for guiding your child.

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I believe Gigi helps us see the bigger picture. We want our children to become loving responsible people. If we look at them through the eyes of love, work on our patience, and discipline wisely, we'll be good parents and they'll become the fine adults they were meant to be.

Pick up

There's a Perfect Little Angel in Every Child: How to Discipline Your Child with Love and Patience

Cover Perfect Little Angel

Available at

Amazon.com

Gigi Schweikert presents workshops at the local, state, and national levels to parents, teachers and corporations. Let's THANK Gigi for sharing her knowledge with us today as a leader in the early childhood education field.

Author Gigi Schweikert

    Gigi Schweikert

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With warm wishes,

Jean Tracy, MSS

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Expert Advice to a Teenager about His Rude Parents

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When Parents Are Rude to Kids

If you’re a parent who uses sarcasm, rude remarks, or putdowns, you can change. In today's blog you’ll read about a thoughtful teen’s concerns. You'll also hear advice from our parenting skills expert, Annie Fox, M.Ed, who wrote Teaching Kids To Be Good People. I will add my impressions too.

What a Sympathetic 15-Year-Old Boy Writes to Annie

"I'm really a sensitive guy. People have turned away from me since I was 10.” He tells Annie he knows what it feels like to be rejected. Now he sees his parents rejecting his 8-year-old sister with their rude remarks.  He can see in his sister’s eyes her loneliness. “She has no friends,” he says. “I feel her pain.” (from page 135)

Annie’s Expert Advice

First, Annie empathizes with the boy. She lets him know he’s a compassionate and kind-hearted person. She suggests he step in and help his sister. “Tell her she is not alone. That you’re her friend and you’ll watch over her.”

Here’s the hard one. Annie tells him to talk to his parents respectfully. “Tell them what you have observed.” (from page 222)

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Jean’s Thoughts

We all need someone in our corner, someone who understands our feelings and who is there for us. Annie encouraged the boy to be that person for his sister.

I also like Annie’s approach because she urged him to tell his parents the behaviors he observed. That’s different from calling them “rude.” Observations are easier to accept. Name calling could cause a big defensive fight from his parents.

How could parents know if they’re rude to their children?

Rude Parents Might Say:

1. “You’re a knucklehead!”

2. “Don’t be so stupid.”

3. “What’s wrong with you?”

4. “I’m ashamed of you.”

5. “When are you ever going to learn?”

Perhaps you’ve said similar things to your kids or even worse like, “I wish you were never born.” Maybe you thought your comments would help your kids make positive changes. Or you could have repeated the words your own parents said to you.

If you are rude or critical and want to change, you can.

First, admit it.

Second, realize your remarks are hurting not helping.

Third, make a plan with or without your spouse for changing these behaviors.

Apologize whenever you’re unkind and then follow your plan. If you do, you’ll be helping your child and yourself become the positive character building people you were meant to be.

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Let's THANK Annie for sharing from her book, Teaching Kids To Be Good People: Progressive Parenting for the 21st Century.

Author Annie Fox

   Annie Fox, M.Ed.

Pick up her book on Amazon.com and read many more letters from worried teenagers. You'll find Annie's wise advice too.

Cover Teaching Kids To Be Good People

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What Do You Think?

 
With warm wishes,

Jean Tracy, MSS

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  • 80 Fun Activities to Share with Your Kids
  • 101 Ways to Get Your Children to Cooperate

****** 

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Reduce Stress: 2 Easy Ways Parents Can Teach Kids How to Relax!

 Girl Meditating

Teaching Your Child to Relax

If you're a stressed parent and fear your children are copying your emotional reactions, stop worrying. Our parenting skills expert, Lori Lite, author of Stress Free Kids, is here to help. Today she'll discuss how stress is contagious, ask you 3 important questions, and give you 2 relaxation techniques.

Lori’s Story

In her book Lori shares the overwhelming pressure she felt as a young mother. Raising both a hyperactive child who took hours to get to sleep and a daughter with night terrors exhausted her. Lori decided to make her life’s journey one of learning about stress, how to relieve it, and how to help others.

Is Stress Contagious?

“Yes,” says Lori Lite. When you feel strain, your child learns to copy your reactions. For instance, do you pack your days with too many responsibilities?

Let’s say your neighbor needs to talk, the sink is leaking, and your boss is calling about your overdue report. How do you react? Many parents feel so much pressure that they tense up inside, sleep less, and get sick more often.

The Stress Quiz

Lori provides you with 10 questions that are easy to answer and quite revealing. Here are 3:

1. Are you yelling at your kids more?

2. Do you cram way too much into your day?

3. Are you saying “Yes” to requests when you wish you said "No?"

If you do the above, don’t be surprised if you’re feeling stressed. I like Lori’s quiz because it shows you what you are doing and what needs to change.

2 Sample Techniques You Can Use Today

Both techniques show you and your child how to relax and deal with current stress.

1. Tell your child, “I am feeling too stressed right now. I am just going to take a minute for myself to sit down and do my breathing.”

Invite your child to sit next to you, identify the stress, and take it down a notch by breathing deeply together.

Can you see how this could benefit both you and your child? What a gift!

2. This skill is one you can use whenever you need it. Again you can do it with your child, in the shower, or when driving to an appointment.

Deeply inhale and exhale with a loud “AHA!” Feel free to do it several times in a row.

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Lori has filled her book with many stress reducing techniques. It’s like a delicious banquet where you can pick the ones that appeal best to you.

I highly recommend Stress Free Kids: A Parent's Guide to Helping Build Self-Esteem, Manage Stress, and Reduce Anxiety in Children for parents, teachers, counselors, and anyone who want to help kids.

   Stress Free Kids

Available at: Amazon.com

Please join me in THANKING Lori Lite for sharing her research and wealth of knowledge to help us and our children live healthy relaxed lifestyles.

  Lori Lite

          Lori Lite  

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What Do You Think?


With warm wishes,

Jean Tracy, MSS

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  • 80 Fun Activities to Share with Your Kids
  • 101 Ways to Get Your Children to Cooperate

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5 Parenting Mistakes and 7 Solutions for Raising Great Kids

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When Parents Give Their Power Away

If you feel disrespected, listen to our parenting skills expert, Dr. Robin Berman. She’s both a psychiatrist and author of the brand new book, Permission to Parent. Today she’ll share 7 major tips from her chapter, ‘Hate Me Now, Thank Me Later.’ You’ll find out why your kids treat you poorly, what to do about it, and how the 7 tips fit the '3 B Formula.'

Why Parents Aren’t Respected

Dr. Robin believes that many parents are reversing their strict upbringing. Instead of parenting from a balanced middle, they raise their kids from the rear, which means they aren’t leading at all. Here are some examples:

1. Kids throw tantrums and get what they want.

2. Children yell at and/or hit parents without negative consequences.

3. Youngsters argue and get their way.

4. Parents give kids too many choices and ask youngsters to make too many big decisions.

5. Mothers and fathers fail to establish clear rules and act inconsistently.

These behaviors put kids in charge.

Dr. Robin knows young brains are not ready for such power. “Kids’ frontal lobes, where critical thinking resides, are still in the very early stages of development. The frontal lobe will not be fully formed until they are well into their twenties.” (page 22)

She also knows not all parents do poorly. Her focus is in helping parents who are confused and will profit from her clear guidelines.

7 Parenting Tips that Put Parents in Charge

1. Make your long term goal to raise a person of character. Dr. Robin suggests your mantra be, “Hate me now. Thank me later.”

2. Follow through when you say “No.”

3. Make few but clear rules and be consistent.

4. Give consequences for bad behavior.

5. Don’t be the friend. Be the parent.

6. Give choices. Make them few and age-appropriate.

7. Reverse Negotiate. The more your kids argue with you, the less they get. She says, “It works like a charm.” (page 26)

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Realize these jewels are just from the first chapter. I like Dr. Robbins’ approach because they fit the 3 B Formula, “Be kind. Be firm. Be consistent.” If parents follow this formula when children are young, parenting will be easier when kids are older. They’ll be raising children with good character too.

One more thing, when you’re the parent, your kids will thrive.

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Pick up Permission to Parent: How to Raise Your Child with Love and Limits.

Permission to Parent

Available on Amazon.com

Scroll down to see a short interview with Dr. Berman on Amazon.com 

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Please support today's author and share your opinions about this blog post. Click on the Comments link below. It will open up for you. We'd love to hear from you.

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What Do You Think?

 
With warm wishes,

Jean Tracy, MSS

Sign up for my FREE Parenting Newsletter and receive:

  • 80 Fun Activities to Share with Your Kids
  • 101 Ways to Get Your Children to Cooperate

****** 

Please “Like" this blog article and click on the icons to share with your social media sites. Thank you so much.