How to Get Your Out-of-Control Teenager to The Treatment Center

 Teenage girl angry

Getting Help for Your Out-of-Control Teenager

Do you have an out-of-control teen? Have you tried everything but nothing works? Sue Scheff, our parenting expert and author of the book, Wits End, will share some ideas on getting your teenager to the residential treatment center. She knows first-hand about the pitfalls and helps parents assess programs for choosing the best. Once you've chosen the program the next step is to get your teenager there.

 

Your Teenager's Sense of Betrayal and Your Feelings of Guilt

Sue Scheff agrees it's difficult to convince your out-of-control teen to agree to go to the residential treatment center. Most adolescents feel betrayed and no parent looks forward to the angry words and tantrums. In fact, Sue knows the guilt a parent feels since she had to face the same problem with her daughter.

Sue advises that a good treatment program will help with your teen's sense of betrayal and your guilt. A good program will get your teen to take responsibility for her behavior that brought her there. Most programs, says Sue, remove all privileges and your teenager must earn each reward. In this way, your teen begins to cooperate.

To calm your guilt, Sue counsels you to learn the details of the program, your teenager's day, and every aspect of your child's life in the facility. Then, she says, "Give yourself time to fight it (the guilt) off."

Getting Your Teenager to the Treatment Facility

Some fortunate parents convince their teens to go but not many in comparison to those who rebel. So what do you do? Here are two suggestions:

1. Be deceptive. Get your adolescent to the facility when she thinks you're taking her somewhere else.

2. "Ask the treatment facility for a list of recommended escort services that you can contact and interview to determine which one you desire to work with." Sue instructs parents to compare rates, availability, and procedures.

If you choose the second, the escort service may come before dawn while your child is sleeping and is taken off guard. It also assures your teen arrives during daylight hours. (From pages 117-123)

Sue Scheff has researched many resources for parents to consider. She is the founder of Parents' Universal Resource Experts, Inc. (P.U.R.E.). Since 2001 Sue has assisted families with valuable information and resources for their children and teens who are struggling with today's peer pressure, experimenting with drugs and alcohol, and simply good kids starting to make bad choices. (From page 169)

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Let's PRAISE Sue for her research into the best programs for your out-of-control teenagers. The story she shares about her daughter in Wits End will save you much grief if you follow Sue's advice.

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Pick up Wit's End: Advice and Resources for Saving Your Out-of-Control Teen to get the information you need.

Cover Wits End
Available at Amazon.com

Author Sue Scheff
       Sue Scheff

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Behavior Problem: Counselor's Advice to Teen for Her Excuse about Stealing

 

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Find Out WhyTeen Blames Parents

 If you’re the parent of a teenager who steals, how should you react to this problem? Find out what one parent did and what our counselor and parenting expert, Annie Fox, advised. The following are excerpts  from Annie's book, Teaching Kids to Be Good People.

What Would You Teach Here?

My parents give me allowance, but not enough. Since I go out with girls I need money. I also need money for my motorbike. My dad understands, but my mom doesn’t let him give me more money.

I earn extra cutting the grass for neighbors. But these little jobs aren’t enough for getting all the money I want.

I came to the extreme point of stealing from the supermarket but I was caught. Now my parents don’t give me any more money. My mom won’t talk to me. I am very sad. – 16-year-old. (Page 59)

Read Annie Fox’s Reply To:

“Why don’t my parents give me more money?”

It sounds like you are blaming your parents (just a little) for the fact that you were “desperate” enough to steal. Nothing your parents did caused you to steal. You knew it was wrong, and there was a chance you would get caught. And you chose to do it anyway. So please take responsibility for what you did. That is the only way that you can avoid making those kinds of choices.

OK, now…moving forward. Your mother is upset and disappointed. She may be angry and hurt as well.

You want more independence, and to get that you need to rebuild the trust that you’ve damaged. It’s going to take time and a “new history” to show your parents that you know how to make good choices.

The first step would be to apologize to them for the hurt you caused. That might help heal things between you. You should also be thinking about what you learned through all of this.

Hopefully you’ve learned something about choices and consequences, so the next time you feel “desperate” to get some money for going out with girls, etc., you will find ways to earn it and not ever steal again. When you figure out what you’ve learned, talk to your parents. Explain your new way of thinking to them. Consistently make healthier choices, and over time, you will help heal the relationship. (From pages 211-212)

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Annie is a wise counselor. She did several great things in her reply:

1. She advised the girl to stop blaming her parents.

2. She reminded the girl that stealing was her choice.

3. She told the girl to take responsibility for her actions.

4. She acknowledged the girl want more independence.

5. She shared the process. Apologize and create a “new history,”

6. She asked the girl to think about what she learned about choices and consequences.

7. She told the girl to earn what she wants.

8. She advised her to explain her new way of thinking to her parent to help heal the relationship.

9. She told her to consistently make good choices over time.

If you have kids with behavior problems, you’ll find great advice from Annie Fox.

******

Pick up Teaching Kids To Be Good People: Progressive Parenting for the 21st Century.

Cover Annie Fox Book Teaching Kids

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Let's HONOR Annie Fox for her unique book filled with letters from teens and her responses to them. We profit by her wisdom for kids and their behavior problems.

Author Annie Fox
 Annie Fox, M.Ed.

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The Out-of-Control Teenager: Could a Boarding School Help?

 

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Is Your Angry Teen Out-of-Control?

If your teenager is seriously out-of-control, have you considered a boarding school? Our parenting expert and author of the book Wits End, Sue Scheff, not only writes about the trouble with her daughter but also shares high quality parenting resources. In today's post Sue is discussing the Therapeutic Boarding School.

 

Therapeutic Boarding School (T.B.S.)

This place is set up to provide an environment for positive emotional growth, with an emphasis on behavior modification.

Is There a Difference between a Therapeutic Boarding School and a Residential Treatment Center?

The goal is pursued by a carefully designed and regulated daily life for each student. The program's overall structure mixes the practice of life skills with academics and therapy. The therapeutic aspect of a T.B.S., however, is not as intense as that of a Residential Treatment Center.

How Much Therapy Will Your Child Receive?

At a Therapeutic Boarding School, a child may only expect to participate in one-on-one therapy sessions as infrequently as once a week, or even biweekly. Group therapy is usually held every day, but positive social skills can also come from the atmosphere itself.

There may be a licensed therapist on staff, but not necessarily on site. Young people can be transported to the therapist for examinations or scheduled sessions, as needed.

What's the Working Philosophy of Good Therapeutic Boarding Schools?

A T.B.S. uses what I call an all-encompassing approach. It is a comprehensive program that integrates all aspects of emotional, spiritual, and physical well-being. Their working philosophy is that a well-structured, positive, respectful, and disciplined living experience that is conducted over months at a time will be absorbed by the child as a natural process.

Is There Discipline in a Therapeutic Boarding School?

Because we are all creatures with a survival instinct, every human being can be counted on to move toward experiences that are rewarding and move away from those that are not. The enforced discipline at a T.B.S. keeps the child in a position to directly control how satisfactory his experience is in that place. Approval, comfort, the respect of others, and the respect of oneself combine to forge powerful exchanges. (From pages 106-107)

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From Sue Scheff's description of the T.B.S. parents can be ready with questions when they're thinking of sending their teen to such a school. Questions like: 1. How often and what kind of therapy do you offer your students? What is your philosophy for helping students? How long does the average student stay? How do you discipline offending students? How much does it cost? These questions and more should help you decide your next step.

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Pick up Wit's End: Advice and Resources for Saving Your Out-of-Control Teen

Cover Wits End

Available at Amazon.com

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Let's give Sue Scheff a HAND for sharing the true story with her daughter and the nightmare of a facility she unwittingly sent her daughter to. Sue knows that parents with out-of-control teens would never knowingly send their child to such a place. That's why Sue has done the research and is the founder of Parents' Universal Resource Experts. She offers many different solutions and recommends the best facilities. 

Author Sue Scheff
      Sue Scheff

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Homework and Friendships: How to Help Your Kids When Friends Get in the Way

 Girl Bigstock Homework.jpg 3046043

Do Friendships Distract Your Teen from Homework?

When friends are more important to your kids than schoolwork, how can you get them to do their homework? Neil McNerney, a school counselor, is here to help. Today he'll tell you 3 things not to say and why you should avoid the word, "but." He'll give you some solutions too.

Mr. McNerney is a father, a parenting expert, and author of the popular book, Homework: A Parents Guide. Let's listen as he shares an excerpt from his book.

Their Friendships Are More Important Than Their Schoolwork

It doesn't matter how many times we tell our kids that schoolwork should come first. They won't agree. For many kids, especially teenagers, friendships are much more important than schoolwork.

The Story of Andrea

"Andrea," 14, was in a constant struggle with her mother about the importance of friends vs. school. Andrea's grades would fluctuate with the ups and downs of her social life. The problem was that, whenever the friendships were going well--or really bad-- her grades would drop.

When she was feeling really good about her friendships, she would spend too much time with them, whether personally or online. Whenever things were going bad, she would be "too depressed to do homework." The only time when friendships weren't getting in the way was when things were "just OK" with her friends. Andrea could then focus on schoolwork.

A School Counselors Perspective

As a counselor, I see this issue quite a bit. The focus on friendships can be very important for many students. It's also necessary, in some respects. We are social beings. We are drawn to make connections with others and emotionally bond with them.

What Should We Do?

1. Don't say, "Schoolwork is more important than friendships." It won't work. Your kid won't believe you, and just saying these types of statements only creates more of a rift between you and your child. Ditto for these similar parent comments:

  • "Your friendship won't help you get into college. Studying will."
  • "I understand she hurt your feelings. But you'll feel better in a few days."
  • "Why don't you take your mind off it by studying?

2. Try being supportive and interested, without adding the "but" at the end of the sentence. For example: "I'm sorry it's going so bad with Julie. You must feel really bad."

Stop there. Do not add anything else. You will be tempted to say something like "But you know that your test is tomorrow." Any influence you gained by being empathic will be lost if you quickly add the "but."

3. Delay the advice until long after the empathy. After you have let her know you understand how bad she feels, wait a while until you remind her of homework. By waiting, you will have a much better chance of being influential. (From pages 98-99)

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I like Neil McNerney's advice to go to your child's feelings first. If you don't show empathy for her feelings, she won't listen to you. She will be even more upset because you "never" understand. I also appreciate knowing the word "BUT" is a troublemaker. To your child it leaves a bad taste like a slug sandwich.

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Pick up Homework: A Parents Guide to Helping Out without Freaking Out

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Let's HONOR Neil McNerney for sharing his expert advice about kids and homework. As a school counselor he's helped numerous parents help their kids achieve in school.

Neil McNerney
Neil McNerney, M.Ed., LPC

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Eating Disorders: How This Teenage Boy Asked for Help!

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Does Your Teenage Boy Have an Eating Disorder?

Eating Disorders can torment teenage boys as well as girls. Our parenting expert and author shares this story and solution in her excellent book, Teaching Kids to Be Good People. Listen as this student pours his heart out to Annie and how she responds.

Boys Get Eating Disorders Too!

What Would You Teach Here?

I know everyone thinks only girls get eating disorders, but I'm a guy and I think I have one and I need help. I eat half of a small energy bar before school, then I don't eat lunch. Then I eat the other half of the bar and some fruit. It's gotten to the point where I'm mad at myself if I even take a bite of food.

I get a lot of hate from people calling me fat and pointing out every flaw I know I already have. My mom says, "I don't think you eat enough." I pretend I don't hear.

People at school ask if I want some of their food and I say no thank you. I know they worry about me I don't feel welcome anywhere I go.

The Dean of Students saw me and asked if I wanted to talk, but I said everything was fine. I know teachers worry about me because they watch me just sit there during lunch and not eat. I don't know what to do. I feel really stuck. - 15-year-old (From pages 71-72)

Annie's Reply to This Teen's Eating Disorder

"I tell people I'm fine but I think I have an eating disorder."

Everything is obviously not "fine." Your mom is worried about you. People at school who offer you their food are worried about you. The Dean of Students is worried about you. And since you just wrote to me for help, I'd say it's safe to deduce that you are worried about you!

Anyone can develop an eating disorder, and it definitely sounds like you are severely restricting calories (possible to avoid being teased.) Now it sounds like you have gotten into a habit of not eating. I'm guessing that when you do eat you're not enjoying the food at all. (An energy bar is not a complete, ongoing source of the nutrients your body needs.)

I'm going to add myself to the list of people who care about you and are worried about you. You say, "I don't know what to do anymore." Here's what you need to do today: Talk to your mom. Tell her the truth.

Tell her what you told me...about not eating...about feeling depressed. Tell your mom that you don't want to feel this way anymore, and you want help. Tell her that you want to talk with the Dean of Students and /or a school counselor. (From page 213)

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Most of us don't think of boys as having eating disorders. How important that this boy trusted Annie enough to tell her about his problem. If he follows her good advice, he may find a good solution.

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Pick up Annie Fox's excellent book, Teaching Kids To Be Good People  and learn the many solutions she offers all of us.

Cover Annie Fox Book Teaching Kids
            Available at Amazon.com

Let's HONOR Annie for helping students and parents with her caring heart and outstanding advice.

Author Annie Fox
    Annie Fox, M.Ed.

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Parenting Problem: How Do I Discipline My Out-of-Control Teen?

 Boy teen angry bigstock

How Do you Discipline Difficult Adolescents?

If you're a parent and your teenager is angry, wild, or out-of-control, how do you discipline him or her with consequences that help? Our parenting expert, Marney Studaker-Cordner, is sharing her advice from her book, The Whipped Parent.

 

How to Choose a Consequence

Things to consider when choosing a responsive consequence:

1. Are you responding to your adolescent while you're emotional?

If you're feeling angry, hurt or frustrated, wait until later to choose the consequence. You can let your adolescent know by saying,

"I'm upset right now and need time to determine how I'm going to respond to your behavior. I'll let you know when I've decided what I'm going to do."

2. Is the consequence fair?

Does it fit the severity of the behavior? You may want to come back to this question after reading Chapter Thirteen on exaggerating and minimizing.

3. Has your adolescent already received a consequence?

It may be unnecessary for him to be given a second consequence. For example, if your child swore at the teacher, he probably already experienced a natural consequence, like school detention. Is it necessary to provide a responsive consequence yourself?

4. Have you developed a fail-proof consequence?

When developing a fail-proof consequence, it may be helpful to think about what your teen likes,or things he wants and asks for. Fail-proof consequences are very difficult to come up with when you deal with someone like Jack (He's mentioned in earlier chapters.). You might be able to find only one or two effective consequences. If that's all you have, use it carefully and consistently.

How to Develop a Fail-Proof Consequence

1. Start by selecting a consequence you think may be fail-proof.

Be specific. What is the exact length of time the consequence will be given for? When will it start and end?

2. Now, check it, to see if it is fail-proof.

List the possible reactions your adolescent may have to this consequence. List all you can think of, covering as many scenarios as possible. If you choose to respond to his behavior of breaking curfew by not giving him rides anywhere for the week, what might he do in response? Hitchhike? Steal your car and drive himself? Steal someone else's car? Walk?

3. Do you still have control over the consequence?

After each of your adolescent's possible reactions ask yourself if you still have control over this consequence. Remember, you can control only your own behavior, so if the consequence depends on your adolescent going along with it, it isn't fail-proof... (to read more advice on consequences go to page 94.)

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I like Kimberly's advice about consequences. As parents we need to really think through the consequences we choose because out-of-control teens will do everything in their power to get you to give up the consequence. It takes a consistent courage to stick to your word.

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Pick up The Whipped Parent: How for Parents Raising an Out-of-Control Teen 

The Whipped Parent

Available at Amazon.com  

Let's APPLAUD Marney Studaker-Cordner, MSW, CSW, Kimberly Abraham, MSW, CSW, with Kathryn O'Dea for writing a book so many parents with out-of-control teens can turn to for advice. A book where the authors understand the problems and offer wise solutions is a treasure indeed.

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8 Parenting Tips: Survey Shows How Religion Helps Teens!

 Family Praying bigstock--10375241

Find Out How Religion Can Help Families

Can parents who raise teens with religion help kids make good life choices? Our parenting expert and author has research to prove it. Dr. Parnell Donahue shares an excerpt from his popular book, Messengers in Denim. Let's find out what he's learned and his 8 parenting tips regarding religion.

 

Religion News Service recently reported on the National Study of Youth and Religion, which has been described as the most comprehensive research ever done on faith and adolescence. Four of five teens in this survey of 3,000 teens and their parents said that religion is important in their lives.

And among parents who said religion was very important in their lives, two-thirds of their children said the same. Most importantly, the survey said that teens with strong religious convictions are more likely to:

. Do better in school

. Feel better about themselves

. Shun alcohol, drugs, and sex

. Care about the poor

. Make moral choices based on what is right rather than what would make them happy (From page 91)

Dr. Donahue's Recommendations and Parenting Tips

1. Belong to an organized religion and attend services regularly.

2. Insist that your kids attend with you and are attentive to the service.

3. Observe your religion's tenets in your home. Read religious books and view religious programs on television.

4. Make sure your teens attend youth group or other structured high school religious education programs.

5. Make use of those teachable moments to express your thoughts and your religion's views.

6. Respect others' religions.

7. Bless your children, your family, and your friends. It shows them you believe what you preach. Blessing even those who dislike you is even more telling.

8. Make religion a habit. (From page 95)

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I like Dr. Donahue's straightforward approach to the importance of religion. Religion offers the values and group support that can help teens make good choices and experience spiritual love. Many popular writers shy away from discussing religion and therefore avoid a powerful force for good.When you read Dr. Donahue's chapter on religion, you'll enjoy true teenage stories.

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Pick up Messengers in Denim: The Amazing Things Parents Can Learn from Teens

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Let's give Dr. Donahue the PRAISE he deserves for sharing the powerful tool of religion and what it can do for our teenagers. You'll love the true stories he shares about teens in his chapter on religion too.

Blog Optimistic Dr. Parnell Donahue

Dr. Donahue

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Teen Suicide Risk: How Parents Can Assess Their Grieving Children

 Boy crying

Assessing Grief

If your child or teenager is overcome by grief, how serious is it? Our parenting experts and authors, Drs. Heidi and Gloria Horsley, have important ways to assess the signs. Here is an excerpt from their excellent book, Teen Grief Relief.

Let's look at a few questions that could help you sort out a person's real risk for ending his or her life.

Assess their risk levels - and yours  -  by honestly answering the following questions:

1. Have I thought about or mentioned suicide?

(There are references to teens' stories from previous pages.)

Admad's response of wishing he'd been with his father doesn't necessarily put him at high risk for suicide. It's not unusual for people who have suffered losses to say that they wish it had been them or that they don't want to live.

However, wishing you had gone with your loved one and having thoughts of killing yourself, like Jay, are very different thoughts.

2. Do I have a plan?

Jay has a loose plan. He could drive his car off a cliff or into a tree. If your answer is "yes," you need to tall someone now.

Tell a parent, a teacher, a therapist, a minister or a friend, or pick up the phone and ask information to give you the suicide-prevention hot line. You may even be put through to one especially for teens.

3. Do I have what I need to carry out the plan?

Jay has access to a car, so he does have the means to carry out the plan. If you do, get rid of it.

Flush the pills, toss the rope, turn in the gun, give up the car keys. Don't do anything spontaneously right now. Call someone whom you know can help you, or call the suicide hot line.

WARNING SIGNS

Feeling

. Hopeless

. Helpless

. Worthless

Thinking or Saying Things Like

. I wish I was never born.

. I wish I was dead.

. Nobody cares if I'm alive or dead.

. Everyone (or certain people) will be better off if I'm dead.

. If I kill myself, nobody will have to worry about me anymore.

Doing Things Like

. Skipping school and getting poor grades.

. Giving away your clothes, jewelry, sports equipment, books, CDs and other personal things.

. Eating and /or sleeping a lot more or a lot less than you used to eat or sleep.

. No longer caring about personal hygiene.

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To find out more risky behaviors and how to create a safety net go to page 40 of Teen Grief Relief: Parenting with Understanding, Support and Guidance.

Cover Teen Grief Relief
             Available at Amazon.com

This is such a serious subject and parents need to know how to assess their teens' suicide risk. Let's give Drs. Heidi and Gloria Horsley our DEEPEST THANKS for their help.

 Drs. Heidi and Gloria Horsley

Drs. Heidi and Gloria Horsley

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10 Parenting Tips: Discuss Peer Pressure, Drugs and Alcohol with Teens

 

School Boy Leader
Help Your Teenager Make Good Decisions

If you need some parenting tips for talking to your teens about peer pressure, drugs and alcohol, you'll find them here. Our parenting expert and author, Dr. Parnell Donahue, is sharing an excerpt from his hopeful book for parents, Messengers in Denim. Since today is Dr. Donahue's birthday, he is giving you a free gift. You find it below.

What Research Suggests about Parents' Influence

Parents exert significant influence on whether their kids choose to drink, smoke, or use illegal drugs. And the earlier parents talk to kids about their social problems, the more effective they are. The number one reason teens give for not using alcohol, tobacco, or drugs is that they do not want to disappoint their parents.

Parenting Tips for Talking with Kids

1. Discuss both good and bad aspects of peer pressure with your kids.

2. Don't accept peer pressure as an excuse for unacceptable behavior. Kids really make their own decisions.

3. Remember that parental pressure is as influential as peer pressure, if not more so.

4. Listen to your kids.

5. Know your kids' friends and their friends' parents.

6. Re-evaluate your own friendships. Are your friends the kind of people you want your kids to become? If not, it's time for a change.

7. Keep tobacco, alcohol, and drugs out of your home and away from your kids!

8. Talk with your kids frequently about alcohol, tobacco, and drugs. Use every opportunity that society provides.

9. If you use alcohol, use it with temperance and responsibility. If you use tobacco or illegal drugs, QUIT.

10. Encourage your kids to tell the authorities if they know of a peer who is using alcohol, tobacco, or drugs.

So if you have children, start talking to them at age 10 or 11 about alcohol and drugs. Tell them what you expect their behavior to be and bring up the subject again every chance you get. (Hollywood and its stars will provide you with more than enough opportunities.) This excerpt is from pages 128-130.

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Perhaps you need to talk to your teenager about teen sexuality. Dr. Donahue shares how to have this discussion. Pick up his book, Messengers in Denim: Amazing Things Parents Can Learn from Teens.

Cover Messengers in Denim

Available at: Amazon.com

Your Gift from Doctor Donahue!

"I have a present for you! For my birthday Amazon and I will be giving away free kindle copies of Messengers in Denim. Just go to Messengers in Denim and click on buy for free, and in seconds you will have a free, no strings attached, version on your Kindle or I-pad. Please tell you friends they are also elgible for a free copy. If anyone wants  to "like" my Amazon book page, or write a review for Amazon that would be fine, but it is not neccessary! Enjoy my birthday, I will! Thanks, Par"

Let's send a BIG HAPPY BIRTHDAY to Dr. Parnell Donahue for writing this masterpiece and giving it to us as a special gift.

Blog Optimistic Dr. Parnell Donahue
  Dr. Donahue

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Jean Tracy, MSS

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How Expectations Can Hurt Parents with Out-of-Control Teens

 

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When Parents' Expectations Begin to Crumble

Parents with high expectations can feel beaten down with their out-of control teens. Our parenting experts and authors for today will give you examples why this is true. Authors Marney Studaker-Corner, Kimberly Abraham, and Kathryn O'Dea have experience with teens. Here is an excerpt from their book, "The Whipped Parent." Let's see what they have to say.

 

The Expectations Road Race

Expectations are a lot like that car ride. Careening ahead at full speed are those expectations your child just can't or won't meet. You know the ones. Those nagging unmet hopes and expectations that leave you feeling disappointed, angry, resentful and full of worry.

You've read the first chapters of this book and may have decided, "Boy, they're right. I can't expect anything from my child. As a matter of fact, I should just give up all my hopes for him. He'll never meet them anyway."

The highest unmet expectations can be followed by extreme lows. "I used to want my child to go to college and be an engineer. I thought he'd have a nice house and family. But he just refused to go to school. Now I figure he'll probably live in a house that's almost condemned. Even that's a high expectation, because he'll probably be homeless."

Sometimes the higher your expectations are,

the harder you hit coming down from them.

A speeding car ride may be exciting the first time you take one. If the ride never stops, however, you end up being fearful, exhausted, overwhelmed and sick. You can probably picture your kid, sitting in the driver's seat, scaring the daylights out of you and refusing to slow down no matter how hysterical you get.

When you're traveling at full speed ahead, the times of high expectations, you're feeling anxious, powerless and fearful.

"I want so much for my child. I'm afraid of how his life will turn out-if he lives to see his future. I need to keep him from ruining his life."

When the car slows down, and your expectations are lowered, you may have given up all hopes and expectations. You feel helpless, depressed, and totally whipped.

"He'll end up dead or in jail. I'm not even going to open myself up to him emotionally, because he'll only hurt me again with his behavior."

Another type of extreme low is when anger and resentment lead you to sabotage your adolescent.

"I hope he does end up in jail for drinking and driving. As a matter of fact, next time he goes out with his buddies, I think I'll tip the cops off about what road he usually takes."

Without realizing it, you may even set him up to fail. Your whipped emotions are what take you from one extreme to the other.

Extremes

As a whipped parent, finding middle ground is the key to feeling... (from pages 45-46)

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The authors captured the thoughts of many parents. Let's APPLAUD them for their work with teens and sharing how well they understand parents who feel whipped.

To read more, pick up their book, The Whipped Parent: Hope for Parents Raising an Out-of Control Teen

The Whipped Parent

Available at Amazon.com

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With warm wishes,

Jean Tracy, MSS

Sign up for my Free Parenting Newsletter and receive:

  • 80 Fun Activities to Share with Your Kids
  • 101 Ways to Get Your Children to Cooperate

****** If you liked this article, please write a comment and send it to your social media sites below.

You’ll also see a green sideways triangle. Click on it to open up and send to your social media sites. Thank you so much.