How Parents Raise Loving Families - 7 Tips + Video

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FIND OUT THE EASY WAY TO RAISE A CARING FAMILY!


Sincere words, a smiling voice, and eye contact are 3 ingredients you can easily use to create caring in your child.

Your words, whether harsh or loving, will be replayed over and over throughout his life. Your harsh words can become the critical judge he'll hear in his head when he does his homework, looks for a job, or raises kids of his own. 

If your words are kind and encouraging, they'll become his inner "Head Coach" and give him the confidence and courage to live a happier more productive and caring life.

But what if she's sassing, demanding, or lying? Clearly this is not the time for coddling and kind words. It could be the time to hold your tongue and not give in to the sass and demands. It's not easy.  IT CAN BE DONE!

How Changing Words Changes Family Life

Here’s a brief video with 7 family compliments that include honest words, a kind voice, and specific comments you can use. You’ll also find out how a tiny box, a family dinner, and noticing behaviors can help you raise a caring family.

Please Watch and Enjoy This Short YouTube Video Now.

Confident Kids! A Powerful Parenting Tool:

 

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With warm wishes, 

Jean Tracy, MSS

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Stubborn Child Activity: Character Building Poem with 7 Questions

  Pouting Girl

You Can Help Hardheaded Child to Cooperate!

Getting your strong-willed child to cooperate can be difficult. Often stubborn youngsters react without thinking. Parents feel frustrated, get mad, and both start arguing. Before you know it, the argument becomes nasty and nobody listens. Nobody wins.

Getting solutions to determined behavior is best when children are in a good mood. Today we have an activity that you can easily use. It's a unique children's poem about stubbornness with 7 questions. It will help you and your kids discuss the issue without pointing fingers.

Find out what your children think about Jake and Jill's (the kids in the poem) behavior. The questions will help them reflect about their own behavior. They'll begin to see that acting like a mule closes minds, loses positive power, and increases ugly moods. 

Cooperation is a better solution. It's more fun too.

Pick up this parent/child poetry gift at Subscriber Gifts  Or http://kidsdiscuss.com/subscriber-gifts.asp then insert the code word: SIBS

Start having great discussions about stubborn behavior today! 

 

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Please let me know if this was helpful by commenting below and sharing this blog on your social media sites.

Thank you so much.

With warm wishes,

Jean Tracy, MSS

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How to Teach Your Bossy Child 7 Leadership Skills

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Bossy Kids Can Become Leaders

IF YOUR CHILD IS TOO BOSSY AND KIDS ARE REJECTING HIM, it can be painful for him and for you. Most children don't have a clue about leadership skills. Yet, they want other kids to follow their lead.

Keep reading to find out the 7 bossy behaviors that turn kids off and the 7 leadership skills your child can learn.

You can teach these skills with helpful conversations, role-playing activities, and/or charting your child's new leadership abilities.

One leadership tip includes resolving conflicts. The key is negotiation. Here are 3 easy things your child can learn to do:

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Leaders Can Resolve Conflicts

1. Ask questions about the conflict and listen to the other' answers.

2. Find out if there is something both sides share in common. This is called 'Common Ground.' Your child can help each side achieve the 'wants' they have wants in common.

3. Then have him ask the big question once tempers cool down and both sides feel listened to. "How can we both win?" or "How can you both win?"

This one skill can be practiced at home by you whenever conflicts arise. Because it's practiced at home, your child will know how use it with classmates and friends.

Can you see how this skill can help change your child from a bossy boy to a trusted leader?

Read more to find out the other 6 simple leadership skills you can teach your child:

7 Leadership Skills Your Bossy Child Must Learn 

http://kidsdiscuss.com/feature_article.asp?fa_id=182

As your child practices these skills, watch him smile as he becomes a likable leader.

Was this helpful?

Please let me know by commenting below.

With warm wishes, 

Jean Tracy, MSS

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Parenting Video: How Bossy Kids Become Leaders

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Teaching Your Bossy Child Leadership Skills

WHEN YOUR CHILD IS BOSSY, does he only care about getting his way? Perhaps he tells kids what to do or what to play. If so, he has the Bossy Kid Problem and you can help him change.

Bossy kids get rejected. It hurts your child and it probably hurts you too. Did you know you can turn your bossy child into a good leader?

Research tells us there are 7 leadership traits your child can learn. Imagine role-playing this one technique, active listening, with your youngster. Of course, you’d want to share these ideas first:

3 Facts Your Strong-Willed Child Needs to Know:

1. Kids care about themselves, their own ideas, and activities.

2. Children don’t want to hear you brag or tell them what to do.

3. When you ask questions and listen to them, it makes them feel good.

First Leadership Behavior - Listen Actively

Explain to your student, “After you ask another child about himself and he’s finished talking, prove you listened.” He may ask, “How?”

Tell him, “It’s easy. All you need to do is repeat the last part of the other child’s words. This helps the other kid remember where he left off and makes it easy for him to keep talking. He’ll love it.”

Role-Play Active Listening

Listen to your child. Repeat part of his last sentence. Listen some more. When he’s finished ask how he felt and then point out how you repeated some of his words and how he continued speaking. Next have him try it by listening to you.

Role-play until it becomes a habit in your home. It will help him practice this listening technique with others. Kids won’t call him, “Bossy.” He may even become a trusted leader because he cared about listening to them.

Watch this brief video, to get all 7 leadership tips for your child.

   

Please subscribe to my YouTube Channel to receive my parenting tips' videos as soon as they are posted. http://bit.ly/1oCOABv 

 

Was this helpful? Please let me know by commenting below.

Thank you so much.

With warm wishes, 

Jean Tracy, MSS

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Gift - 7 Communication Problems Parents CAN Overcome

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Practice 5 Communication Skills to Prevent This!

COMMUNICATION PROBLEMS BETWEEN PARENTS CAN BE EXPENSIVE! According to the law offices of William 3. Neary, the average cost of divorce is $15,000-30,000. Child Custody Evaluations are $2,000-$10,000 and then there are moving expenses, health insurance, child custody expenses plus a whole lot more. That’s just the monetary side.

Emotionally, divorce puts the whole family through turmoil. Counseling is often recommended for parents and children.

Today’s gift shares 7 communication difficulties many parents experience and 5 communication skills to practice.

Fighting Couples Need to Make 2 Choices:

1. The decision to overcome communication breakdowns.

2. The determination to practice good communication with each other.

To download your free parenting gift, click on Subscriber Gifts.

Then insert the code word OVERCOME.

Give your family a brighter future. Practice the skills that increase love, respect, and keep your together.

Add this gift to your notebook or binder to use whenever you need it.

To get more couple help pick up Parents in Love to make your romance sizzle.

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Please let me know. Thank you so much.

With warm wishes, 

Jean Tracy, MSS

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Conversations: 5 Top Ways to Get Your Child to Confide in You

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Listening Builds Love and Trust

If you’d like your kids to confide in you, conversations are essential. Our parenting skills expert, Carole Disseldorp, is here to show us how. Carole is a parent educator, counselor, and the author of, Easier Parenting.

Today she’ll share 5 listening tips, the best type of questions to ask, and good times for creating the kind of talks that children trust. Let’s find out her advice.

How to Listen When Your Kids Are Talking:

1. Turn toward them.

2. Look eye-to-eye.

3. Ask questions to help them share more.

4. Reflect back their meaning or feelings to show you understand.

5. Avoid interrupting or arguing.

Carole says, “If we can show interest, resist interrogating, and abstain from being judgmental, our children will be more likely to share their experiences, feelings, and thoughts.”

Open-Ended Questions Move the Conversation Forward:

Open-ended questions can’t be answered with:

  • Grunts
  • Yes
  • No

These questions help kids share their observations, feelings, and thoughts. For example, “What do you think about…?”

Where to Enjoy Great Conversations with Kids:

  • Mealtimes
  • Driving times (Keep your eyes on the road.)
  • Screen-free times

Carole warns, “If we criticize our children when they open up to us, they are less likely to confide in us in the future.” (From pages 11-14)

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Jean’s Impressions:

If we follow Carole’s advice, it will make parenting easier. Her tips for listening and asking questions are crucial. When children trust that we will listen with interest and kindness, they’ll share their deeper thoughts.

Parents who interrupt, criticize, and argue shut down their power to influence. Why? Because these behaviors hurt feelings and break the trusting bond with their kids.

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Be sure to pick up Easier Parenting: 8 Vital Principles fo Guide Your Children's Behavior Successfully

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Available at: Amazon.com

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Let's THANK Carole for her clear and common sense approach to raising kids. She makes parenting easier for all of us.

Carole Disseldorp
   Carole Disseldorp

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What Do You Think?

 
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Jean Tracy, MSS

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5 Parenting Tips: TV Time for Your Teenager

 

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Is Your Teenager Living His Life Through TV?
Does your teenager spend too much time watching TV? If you'd like some easy parenting tips about TV time in your house, consider the expert advice from our parenting author, Dr. Parnell Donahue. The following excerpt is from his book about adolescents, Messengers in Denim.

 

Dr. Parnell loves to tell stories, like the one about Darrel and his dad. Darrel's dad, an UPS driver, brought his boy into see Dr. Parnell, a pediatrician, for a check-up. They began arguing about who watched more TV. It turns out the father watched 3-4 hours a night when he could have spent more time enjoying his family.

Dr. Parnell sees TV as an addiction because many children, as well as, adults spend too much time watching and not enough time living their own lives. He researched the American Academy of Pediatrics and presented their recommendations:

Here are 5 of 9 suggestions you can start today:

1. Keep TV sets out of your child's bedroom.

2. Record high quality TV programs to watch after homework is completed.

3. View programs with your child and discuss their thoughts during the commercials.

4. Allow no more than 1-2 hours of TV per day.

5. Encourage children to play, read, practice sports, and develop hobbies. (From page 184)

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I appreciate the wisdom Dr. Parnell offers. His stories are real and insightful. You almost feel like you're sitting in on his conversations with teens. He also backs up his advice with research which gives you confidence that his ideas are valuable.

Let's THANK Dr. Parnell Donahue for his tireless work in helping parents understand their teenagers and his practical parenting advise.

Blog Optimistic Dr. Parnell Donahue
Dr. Parnell Donahue

Pick up Messengers in Denim

Cover Messengers in Denim

Available at Amazon.com  

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Jean Tracy, MSS

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Character Building: How To Have Conversations with Kids That Promote Integrity

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Parenting Succeeds When Children Learn Integrity!

If building character in your kids and promoting integrity are importing parenting skills to you, keep reading. Our parenting expert and author, Annie Fox, is sharing an excerpt from her brand new book, Teaching Kids to Be Good People.

 

Real World Assignment: Integrity

When kids get the message that their best isn't good enough unless they take home the gold, how can we be surprised when they break the rules to get what they want (including our approval)?

Fuel for Thought

Where did you learn your values regarding personal integrity? When a cashier or waitperson makes a mistake in your favor, how do you typically respond? Would you respond differently if your child were with you? Think about a recent time when your integrity was tested? What happened? What did you learn?

Conversations That Count

Discuss the concept of "personal integrity" (adherence to moral and ethical principles; soundness of moral character; honesty). To make the concept real, share examples with each other of when you stuck with your principles as well as instances when you let your principles slip. Discuss what you learned when you did and did not live up to your own standards. Together, explore the connection between integrity and trust and what can happen when we find out someone we trusted hasn't been trustworthy.

Teach

Check in regularly with your child about tests of his/her personal integrity at school and online. Creating a safe place to talk about ethical challenges helps kids gain confidence in processing options and doing the right thing.

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Annie Fox encourages us to really talk with our children about issues in their lives. She tells us to make our homes a safe place to share their moral dilemmas and concerns. You'll find top-notch advice in her book with real life problems and solutions. She is a nationally respected character educator with 30+ years of experience.

Pick up Annie Fox's book, Teaching Kids To Be Good People, Progressive Parenting for the 21st Century

Cover Teaching Kids To Be Good People
Available at Amazon.com

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Let's give our heartfelt THANKS to Annie Fox for giving us the information we need to build character in our children.

  Author Annie Fox

       Annie Fox, M.ED.

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Jean Tracy, MSS

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Parenting Skills: How Family Conversations Increase Children's' Vocabulary!

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Family Dinner Conversations Promote Vocabulary in Kids

You can increase your parenting skills with family dinner conversations. Better yet you'll be increasing your children's vocabulary and literacy too. Our parenting expert and author, Ellen Galinsky, shares the research of Catherine Snow in Ellen's book, Mind in the Making. Let's find out the truth behind Snow's research. 

The Research about Children's Literacy

In the research 80 low-income families with three-year-old children were visited when the kids were three, four, and five. The children were tested on their literacy skills too. The parents taped their dinner conversations.

Parents Use a Sophisticated Vocabulary, Snow Says:

In these dinner table conversations, of course, there's always a lot of talk about "Eat your peas" and "Keep your elbows off the table" and Pass the noodles," but in some of the families, in addition, there's wonderfully interesting conversation about what proposals the governor just suggested for the new budget, or how the construction of the expressway is going to influence the neighborhood.

And these conversations are full of wonderful words like budget and governor and proposal and neighborhood-words that children might not use and probably don't understand fully. We found that families that used words like that in their dinner table conversations had children with much larger vocabularies two years later.

So part of vocabulary acquisition is learning the words that are going to be important in school, the words that second-grade teachers think when a child uses them,

"Oh, wow, that was a good word; that's a smart kid."

Those words are signals about the sophistication of the child's thinking. And of course they are also tools for thinking.

The difference between knowing three thousand words and knowing fifteen thousand words when you arrive at kindergarten is enormous. The child who knows three thousand words know words like shoes and milk and jump. The child who knows fifteen thousand words knows words like choice and possibility-words that index a more complex array of possibilities for dealing with the world.

Parenting Skills

Parent-talk does not mean baby talk, talking down to preschool-aged children, or a constant flood of words. Using meaningful, grown-up words with children as they enter the toddler and pre-school years helps them learn and appreciate new words."

An Exercise:  What Do Your Dinnertime Conversations Sound Like?

Listen to your mealtime conversations as if you are a researcher. What did you learn? (from pages 126-129)

I liked the common sense way Catherine Snow conducted the research. The results show the importance of family dinner conversations. The next time our family gets together with the grandkids, I plan on doing the suggested exercise. How about you?

Pick up Mind in the Making: The Seven Essential Life Skills Every Child Needs 

  Cover ~ Mind in the Making
Available at Amazon.com

Let's APPLAUD Ellen Galinsky for bringing Catherine Snow's research to us and for sharing a practical tip on how to increase our children's vocabulary at the dinner table.

      Ellen Galinsky         Applause_18229118

       Ellen Galinsky

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Sit back, relax, and share your opinions about this blog post. Please comment in the tiny comment link below. We want to hear from you.

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With warm wishes,

Jean Tracy, MSS

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You might also like:

 Character Building: Problem Stories for Family Discussions

  
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10 Top Character Tips for Developing Potential in Kids

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Building Character, Potential, and Flexable Thinking in Kids

If you'd like to build character in your kids and develop their potential too, keep reading. Our parenting expert, Kendra Delano, has taught children to think flexibly and positively, communicate effectively, overcome adversity, and make great choices throughout her 17 year career as an international educator. Let's listen to her advice.

Top 10 Tips for Developing Character, Potential, and Flexible Thinking:

First ~Teach Your Children to Observe:

Whenever someone enters a new setting, he or she should learn to watch how the people are behaving before making any attempt to interact. Are they having quiet or boisterous conversations? Are there children running around or are most people sitting down? This is the most important element in learning to adapt to a new environment.

Second ~ Venture Out ~ Travel:

You don’t have to leave the country. If you live in the suburbs go into a rural area or the city. Most urban areas have ethnic sections such as China Town, Greek Town, etc. Realize that the first people to approach you are usually in some form of sales and marketing. Quietly walk on. After that soak in every flavor, sound and interaction!

Third ~  Encourage Reading: Children learn vicariously from strong characters. Authors usually plant valuable insights and lessons into their stories. Voracious readers tend to be wise people.

Fourth: Show Children that You Withhold Judgment:

Avoid labeling any person or situation as good or bad. I have an example. A friend’s teenage daughter was telling about a girl with a poor reputation. I asked WHY she thought that girl went with so many different boys. After a pause she replied, “Because her dad left home a long time ago. She doesn’t see him so maybe she needs more attention from boys.” Bingo. Encourage children to understand and think below the surface.

Fifth ~ Never Confuse a Child’s Behavior with Their Worth:

I NEVER use the expression, “You are a bad boy or girl.” It hurts me just to write it. Everyone is valuable and intrinsically good. There are only good people who CHOOSE to behave badly. Behaviors can be modified.

Sixth ~ Encourage Children to Label Their Feelings (develop self-awareness):

Stick to the basic ones: mad, sad, glad, hurt, ashamed, afraid, and lonely.

Seventh ~  Keep a Journal:

In addition to making diary entries have children label the choices they make each day and the outcomes of those choices. Encourage children to find a correlation between the words and behaviors chosen and how their days are unfolding.

Eighth ~ Encourage Children to Consider New Possibilities:

As a teacher I used to read the story of Chicken Little to my first graders. After the story I asked, “How is Chicken Little the same as a child who shouts, “He stole my pencil!?” I asked the children to brainstorm how a pencil could have found its way into a classmate’s desk. They answered that it could have fallen on the floor and been picked up, that it could have rolled over to the desk, that the same brand of pencil could have been purchased by two different students, etc.

Ninth ~ Encourage Children to Problem Solve:

So many well-intentioned parents jump in to solve their children’s problems. Wait. See how resourceful and ingenious your child can be. Remember the person who tried to help a butterfly break out of its cocoon. The butterfly died because it needed to do the work itself!

Tenth ~ Show Your Children That You Sometimes Change Your Mind:

Show them that after considering new information you have changed your position. Wise people take their time in making a decision and are never afraid to admit they were wrong.

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Connect with Kendra and get her book, 'Showtime' at:  www.SameDayDifferentChoices.com

Blog Potential ~ Showtime Book
  'Showtime'

Let's give Kendra a GRATEFUL HAND for her outstanding tips. She has the knowledge and the ability to communicate well.

 Blog Optimistic Kendra Delano      Applause_18229118

Kendra Delano

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Bonus Article:

How Discussions, Quotes, and Compliments Build Character in Kids

at:  http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/feature_article.asp?fa_id=119

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Parents, it's your turn to take the stage:

What are your opinions about this blog post or your suggestions for helping your kids? Please answer in the comment link below.

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With warm wishes,

Jean Tracy, MSS

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