7 Family Discussion Questions Boost Kids' Self-Image

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FUN DISCUSSIONS WITH KIDS PROMOTE FAMILY UNITY!

Praise or criticism, which motivates kids to do their best? Too much criticism often makes people bitter not better. Research advises us to give 3-6 compliments for every negative comment because kind remarks help lessen the sting from complaints.

If you must disapprove of your child’s behavior, there are 3 rules:

  1. Do it privately.
  2. Be brief, no lectures.
  3. Suggest a positive behavior or solution.

Goal for Giving Praise

You don’t want your child to live for other people’s approval. A nickname for pure approval seekers is "Love Slob."No one wants to hear their child called a "Love Slob."

Your goal in using praise is to increase your child’s inner motivation which means they do their best because that’s their positive self-image. It’s who they know they are.

Use our gift today which includes the poem, “I Caught You Being Good Today,” by downloading, discussing, and getting your children to answer the 7 discussion questions.

If you do, you’ll find out:

  1. How criticism feels to your children.
  2. Whether they notice each others mistakes more than their good qualities.
  3. What would motivate them the most, criticisms or compliments.
  4. If they’d like to focus on the good in each other more often.
  5. How they’d like to share with each member the good they see.
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"You walked the dog around the block."

 

You’ll also have access to the short video, Confident Kids – A Powerful Parenting Tool.

Pick up your parenting present at: Subscribers' Gifts by inserting the Code Word:

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I suggest you keep this parenting gift in a folder to use whenever you need it.

 

 Please let me know if this was helpful by commenting below:

Thank you so much.

With warm wishes, 

Jean Tracy, MSS

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Parenting Video Helps Kids with Out-of-Control Feelings

YOU CAN HELP YOUR CHILDREN CONTROL THEIR FEELINGS. But how? Yelling

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Parenting Tips for Helping Kids with Feelings


"Snap out of it!" won't help kids. Ignoring their emotional explosions doesn't help. Neither does complaining, "I'm sick and tired of your whining!"

If you'd like a parenting method that works, watch this brief YouTube Video. It will show you exactly how to help your child turn difficult feelings into healthy emotions.

Watch the video as often as you like or copy the script below it by clicking on "Show More."  Use it whenever you need it.

View it on YouTube for the video and script:

How Parents and Kids Discuss Feelings

Or watch it here:

 

Pick up the Goal-Setting Kit and help your child use her imagination to achieve her goals. She can use this skill throughout her life. Great for boys too!

  Kd004_Goal Pyramid Kit

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Please let me know. Thank you so much.

With warm wishes, 

Jean Tracy, MSS

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Brain Power: How Parents Teach Children Goal-Setting

Boy feeling fear jpgGoal-Setting Can Overcome Fear!

Now parents can teach kids how to set goals in 3 simple steps. To show what I mean, I made a YouTube video which I'll share below. It includes some of the following:

Imagine this boy shaking as he shares his book report.  Facing his fellow students he tries to remember his thoughts but his throat is dry and he can't talk. After rushing to his seat he buries his   head in his arms and tries not to cry.

Telling him to relax won't work. What I'm about to share will.

Your child doesn't have to feel panic. Instead of fearing class presentations, he can visualize them before they even happen. When he gets up in front of his classmates, he will do well if he's followed the 3 steps. Why? Because his visualization, one of the steps, works like a rehearsal.

 

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Reaching Goals Lifts Your Child's Spirits.

Would you like your child to feel great?  When kids create goals and reach them, their spirits soar. It gives them confidence to try again. The method you are about to teach your child offers them a method to use for life.

You can use it too. As a counselor, I've taught it to many adults. They were amazed at what they achieved.

Teach Your Child to Pick a Realistic Goal

Advise your child to choose a goal that she truly wants to accomplish, like catching fly balls, singing a song on key, playing her guitar for the school assembly, or talking to kids she'd like for friends but is afraid to approach.

The Goal Must Be Actionable:

1. It must be something she could actually achieve.Bigstock_Idea_Girl_5381432
2. It needs to be time limited - something she could accomplish in a specific amount of time.

3. She must have the resources she needs to make it happen. For instance, if she doesn't have access to a guitar, playing for the school assembly is only a dream not a goal.

Here are the 3 Steps to Achieving Goals:

1. Say It.

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"I am seeing the audience liking my solo."

Say, "I am..." + Goal (as if it is already reached.)

2. Sense It.

Happy boy
He's sensing the feeling he wants.

Your child must choose and sense the feeling he wants, like joy.

3. See it.

Boy shaking hand
I am looking at my class as I give my science report.

Visualize it! He must look out toward the goal rather than see himself. He won't be looking at himself when he gives his report. He'll be looking at the class.

Say It. Sense It. See It Altogether in One Moment

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I am seeing, sensing, and saying my goal as if I've already achieved it.

Say It. Sense It and See It Morning and Night Until the Goal Is Reached

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Advise your child to see it, sense it, and say it before rising in the morning and before sleeping at night.

Pick up your copy of my Goal-Setting Kit which includes:

  • Easy directions designed by professional child counselor.
  • Cutout Goal Setting Pyramid. Print as many as you wish on on card stock.
  • 6 goal setting cards(use card stock) Print as many as you wish.
  • Parenting article on goal setting for kids.
  • 80 activity rewards
- See more at: http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/parent_resource_center.asp?pr_id=kd004#sthash.oTof2CBg.dpuf

1. Easy Directions

  • Easy directions designed by professional child counselor.
  • Cutout Goal Setting Pyramid. Print as many as you wish on on card stock.
  • 6 goal setting cards(use card stock) Print as many as you wish.
  • Parenting article on goal setting for kids.
  • 80 activity rewards
- See more at: http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/parent_resource_center.asp?pr_id=kd004#sthash.oTof2CBg.dpuf1. Easy directions

2. Cutout goal-setting pyramid

3. 6 goal-setting cards

4. 80 activity rewards

The Goal-Setting Video

As you watch the video I hope you will "like" it and please subscribe to my YouTube Channel for more parenting videos.

 

Please share your opinions about this post. Click on the Comments link below. It will open up for you. We'd love to hear from you.

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What Do You Think?

 
With warm wishes,

Jean Tracy, MSS

Sign up for my FREE Parenting Newsletter and receive:

  • 80 Fun Activities to Share with Your Kids
  • 101 Ways to Get Your Children to Cooperate

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Please “Like" this article and click on the icons to share with your social media sites. Thank you so much.

 


FREE Gift: Tells You How to Motivate Your Child to Keep Trying

Young Teen with Math Book
Gift for Motivating Kids with Confidence

If you'd like to motivate your child to avoid discouragement and keep trying, you'll like today's fun gift. It's a well-used parenting skill that really works.

The Failure

I recently spoke with a teenage girl and asked her, “How did you deal with your math grade?” Earlier she told me she had flunked it.

“I felt terrible,” she answered.

“Did you do anything about it?”

“I did.”

The 'Can-Do' Behavior

What she did and how she faced failure is the subject of today’s gift. It comes from something I do with my family and you can do it with yours. If you choose to use it, you’ll:

  1. Learn lots of wonderful information.
  2. Motivate your child to face failures.
  3. Encourage her to keep trying.
  4. Give her the right mindset for success and failure.
  5. Boost her self-confidence.

To pick up your gift go to:

Subscriber Gift

http://www.kidsdiscuss.com/subscriber-gifts.asp

Insert the Code Word:

Try

Then download your gift.

 

For more help with motivating your child, pick up Jean's Goal-Setting Kit

Goal Kit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Goal-Setting Kit

Now you can help your children achieve their goals when they use this simple 3-step method.

Available at KidsDiscuss.com

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One More Thing:

Did you notice this blog/newsletter looks a little different? I'm streamlining my new work in one easy place!  Now you'll receive all the parenting tips and tools from my book reveiws, my newsletters, gifts, and articles.

Today, I hope you'll pick up my parenting gift for being a loyal subscriber.

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Please support today's author and share your opinions about this blog post. Click on the Comments link below. It will open up for you. We'd love to hear from you.

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What Do You Think?

 
With warm wishes,

Jean Tracy, MSS

Sign up for my FREE Parenting News and receive:

  • 80 Fun Activities to Share with Your Kids
  • 101 Ways to Get Your Children to Cooperate

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Please “Like" this blog article and click on the icons to share with your social media sites. Thank you so much.

 


Motivation: How to Promote a Winning Attitude in Your Child

 

Boy smiling
Motivation Helps Your Kids!

To motivate a winning attitude in your child, Carol Josel, parenting expert and author of the book, Other-Wise and School-Wise, is here to share some great advice. First, she'll tell us the signs of a winning attitude. Next she'll offer 6 motivation strategies for  kids and, finally, 5 tips for setting goals.

 

The Signs of Successful Attitudes in Children

How would you answer, "Who cares about your child's success more, you or your child?" If you didn't answer, "your child," you've got work to do. So many of us parents worry. We want our kids to succeed. We push them even when their feet stubbornly hold tight because they're not motivated.

The signs that your child is inspired depend on his view of himself. If you'd like to know, ask him these 3 questions:

1. Do you think you can succeed?

2. Do you want to succeed?

3. Why do you want to succeed?

If your child is focused on his own progress and is willing to take on challenges, don't worry. He is motivated. But if he isn't, let's listen to 6 of Carol's  20 suggestions for helping him move in the right direction.

1. Help your child get started on an assignment or project, if necessary, but then stand back.

2. Build on your child's strengths.

3. Believe in your child-and let him/her know it.

4. Acknowledge your youngster's hard work.

5. Encourage new experiences (sports, drama, painting, music).

6. Help your child set goals and find ways to achieve them. (From page 65.)

Advice for Setting Fun Goals:

Your child will feel motivated if she picks out a goal, works hard, and achieves that goal. Start with a goal your child wants to achieve. Hold a brainstorming session. Ask your child to set a fun goal for himself. Ask, "What is something you want?" "How will you help yourself achieve it?"

 Brainstorming Sample Goals:

!. Read a book on her favorite topic.

2. Play a sport she might like.

3. Learn to play a musical instrument.

Carol advises parents to encourage kids to break down big goals into small short-term goals with a due date.

Brainstorming Short-Term Goals:

Let's say your daughter loves books. You might help her by brainstorming this plan:

1. I will go to library

2. I will spend time finding a fun book.

3. I will check it out and bring it home.

4. I will pick a time to read it each day.

5. I will finish it in 2 weeks.

When she's completed her goal. Let her know you're impressed with her effort. Ask her, "How do you feel about accomplishing your goal?" Get her to talk about how she motivated herself. She'll love to share her thoughts with you. This could motivate her achieve even more goals. (From pages 64-69).

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Let's PRAISE Carol Josel, a true educator and learning specialist. Her Guide is filled with activities that you can use like a fun workbook. Or better yet, use it for family dinner discussions to keep your kids mentally alert and happily motivated.

Author Carol Josel

   Carol Josel

Pick up a copy of Other-Wise and School-Wise: A Parent Guidebook    You'll have fun reinforcing your kids' thought processes even when they're not in school.

Cover Other-Wise

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Please support today's author and share your opinions about this blog post. Just click on the COMMENTS link below. It will open up for you. We want to hear from you.

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   Type Your Comment!

With warm wishes,

Jean Tracy, MSS

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****** If you liked this article, please write a comment and send it to your social media sites below.

 Click on the icons or Share This right next to the Green Triangle below to open up your social media sites and send. Thank you so much.

Character Building: 6 Ways to Teach Kids Leadership Skills

 

   School Boy Leader
Teach Your Children Leadership Skills Today!

If you'd like to build character and raise a leader, stay tuned. Alex Uch, a freelance writer, is sharing 6 ways to teach your kids leadership skills from his article "6 Things You Can Do To Develop Leadership Skills in Your Kids."

Some children are natural born leaders.  Others, however, struggle with stepping up and taking a leaderships position.  It is important that as a parent you do your best to help develop leadership skills in your kids to help prepare them for the future.   Use the tips below to guide you in developing these all important skills.

1. Encourage them to make decisions. Are you guilty of controlling each and every decision your kids make?  Decision making is one of the most important aspects of being a leader. Allowing them to make their own decisions regarding the simple things such as what to wear, their hairstyles, etc., you are helping them develop the decision making skills needed to be a leader.
 

2. Help strengthen communication skills. Communication is also crucial to leadership skills.  Teach your kids the foundation of communication by talking with them and allowing them to express how they feel. Encourage them to talk to adults to gain practice in communication.
 

3. Teach them to negotiate with friends and peers. This is a tough skill to teach but can be very beneficial in developing leadership skills. Trading playing cards is one example of how your child can learn negation skills.
 

4. Problem solving skills will be important. Don’t jump in to solve problems for your kids.  Give them opportunities to work it out on their own. 

5. Teach your kids to plan ahead. Real leaders know how to plan ahead.  Can your child plan ahead for things that will happen soon? Let them take part in planning family events or vacations.  It will be fun for them and they will learn leadership skills along the way.

6. Don’t be too pushy! Don’t overreact if your child isn’t a natural born leader. Sometimes, it takes time to develop these skills.  Being too pushy may actually drive them away from wanting to take on a leadership role.  Help them along but don’t go overboard with it.

Leaderships skills will come naturally for some kids.  These children will need very little encouragement to develop the necessary skills to be successful in life.  If your child needs a little help along the way, use the tips above as guidance in developing leadership skills.

This article has been written by Alex of http://www.matryoshkanestingdolls.com/

 

Let's give a warm hand to Alex for sharing his excellent ideas.

Alex Uch headshot                Applause_18229118
   Alex Uch
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Parents, it's your turn to take the microphone:

What are your opinions about this blog post or your suggestions for building leadership in  your kids? Please answer in the comment link below.

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Bonus Article: Goal-Setting for Kids ~ How This Self-Talk Technique Raises Achieving Kids

With warm wishes,

Jean Tracy, MSS

Sign up for my FREE Parenting Newsletter and receive 80 Fun Activities to Share with Your Kids and 101 Ways to Get Your Children to Cooperate.

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How 3 Simple Questions Lead to Goals and Character in Kids!

  Father, Son Homework

 Building Character with Goals and 3 Simple Questions

A great way to build character in kids is through goal setting. But how? Bob Proctor, the great author and motivational speaker, offers 3 essential questions. Before learning about the questions let’s find out the importance of positive goals.

Why Parents Need to Teach Positive Goal Setting

Children must see goals clearly because, like all of us, they move toward their pictures. If their pictures portray failure, they will fail. This is where you come in. Teach them to form positive pictures with clear goals.

How Moving Toward a Negative Picture Causes Failure

Let’s pretend your son is picturing failing a math test.  He decides not to study because he’s telling himself, “Why try? I’ll never get it.” The result will be failure because he turned his self-talk into a negative picture.

What Can You Do to Promote Clear Goals with Positive Pictures?

Ask your son to clearly picture receiving a good grade. Give him all the time he needs. Ask him if he likes the feeling that goes with getting a good grade. Chances are he’ll say, ‘Yes.’

Next ask him to picture himself studying for the test and answering all the questions correctly. Does he like the feeling of success? If so, he’s ready for Bob Proctor’s first question.

1. Can you do this?

In other words, can you study for the test to pass it? If your son’s answer is, ‘Yes,’ ask him the second question.

2. Are you willing to do it?

Meaning, are you willing to study for the test to pass it. If he’s willing to do it, then ask the third question.

3. How can you make it happen?

Get him to brainstorm solutions.

His Possible Solutions:

1. Study the examples in the book.

2. Take time to think through each problem.

3. Ask the teacher, you, or a classmate for help.

 Your Action Step:

Talk to your child about how our thoughts are the pictures we make come true.  Ask your child to start by sharing a small goal with you. Ask the 3 questions. If the answer to the first two is “Yes,” then ask your child, “How can you make it happen?”

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By Jean Tracy, MSS

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Bonus Article:

Goal-Setting for Kids ~ How This Self-Talk Technique Raises Achieving Kids

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Parents, it's your turn to take the stage:

What are your opinions about this blog post or your suggestions for helping your kids? Please answer in the comment link below.

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With warm wishes,

Jean Tracy, MSS

 Jean Tracy, MSS invites you to receive 80 fun activities to share with your children when you subscribe to her FREE Parenting Newsletter 

******If you liked this article, please send it to your social media sites below.

 


How to Boost Character and Potential in Kids with 12 Easy Goals

 Girl at Fence
 Goal Setting Begins with What Kids Want to Achieve

If you’d like to boost character in your kids through teaching them goal setting, you’re in for a treat from the Care4hire blog. Keep reading to find 12 ways to teach setting goals to your children.

“You want to teach your kids to set goals, get to work on them, and ultimately achieve them.  How can parents and babysitters help kids with this life lesson?

1. Talk to your kids about the goal setting, progress, and achievement in your own life.

2. Talk with your kids about what goals they would like to set for themselves. Younger kids should have short-term goals. Teens can establish longer-term goals (i.e., college and career planning).

3. Write down the goals you have agreed upon. Each goal should be recorded on a separate piece of paper or poster board.

4. Talk with your kids about what steps they think they need to take to achieve their goals. Each step toward goal achievement should be discussed.

5. On the goal papers or poster boards referenced in #3 above, record the steps to goal achievement. 

6. Post the papers or poster boards in a location that is highly visible to your kids.

7. Periodically review your kids’ progress relative to their goals.

8. Praise your kids when they successfully achieve steps along the way to goal achievement.

9. Encourage your kids (or redirect your kids, depending on the nature of the goal) when steps are not achieved.

10. Periodically review the goals and their steps to ensure that the goals continue to be achievable and that the steps remain the best or most realistic means to achieve the goals. (Note: many young kids lack perseverance.

Don’t let your kids easily wander from one goal to another without goal achievement or a valid reason for the change of heart. For example, if one of your kids set “save money to buy the music box I like” as her goal two months ago, but she’s not made as much money as she wanted so she now wants to abandon that goal for something more fun, perhaps it’s best to allow her to add the fun goal while still pursuing the original goal as well.)

11. If your kids cannot achieve one or more of their goals, do a goal post-mortem. Without being accusatory, try to determine what went wrong and what can be done to ensure that the next goals set will more likely be achieved. (Note: there may need to be consequences for some goals not being achieved. For example, in the examples above, if one of your kids had getting an “all ‘A’ report card” as her goal, but she got two failing grades instead, a consequence may be warranted.)

12. Celebrate with your kids when they achieve their goals. Goal achievement, for most kids, is a reward in itself. However, celebrations in recognition of goal achievement reinforce the benefits of goal achievement. So, have a pizza night and let your kids choose the kind of pizza they want. Or give them an extra hour to stay up one evening. Or celebrate in whatever way you and your kids think best.”

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Let’s give a BIG HAND to Care4hire for these great goal setting ideas.

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Connect with Care4hire at http://blog.care4hire.com/goals/456 or

www.Care4hire.com

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Bonus Article:

Goal-Setting for Kids ~ How This Self-Talk Technique Raises Achieving Kids

*******

Parents, it's your turn to take the stage:

What are your opinions about this blog post or your suggestions for helping your kids? Please answer in the comment link below.

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With warm wishes,

Jean Tracy, MSS

Sign up for my FREE Parenting Newsletter and receive 80 fun activities to share with your kids.

******If you liked this article, please send it to your social media sites below.